Acta Neurochirurgica

, Volume 156, Issue 8, pp 1615–1622

Clinical applications of intracranial pressure monitoring in traumatic brain injury

Report of the Milan consensus conference
  • Nino Stocchetti
  • Edoardo Picetti
  • Maurizio Berardino
  • Andràs Buki
  • Randall M. Chesnut
  • Kostas N. Fountas
  • Peter Horn
  • Peter J. Hutchinson
  • Corrado Iaccarino
  • Angelos G. Kolias
  • Lars-Owe Koskinen
  • Nicola Latronico
  • Andrews I. R. Maas
  • Jean-François Payen
  • Guy Rosenthal
  • Juan Sahuquillo
  • Stefano Signoretti
  • Jean F. Soustiel
  • Franco Servadei
Clinical Article - Conference Report

DOI: 10.1007/s00701-014-2127-4

Cite this article as:
Stocchetti, N., Picetti, E., Berardino, M. et al. Acta Neurochir (2014) 156: 1615. doi:10.1007/s00701-014-2127-4

Abstract

Background

Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring has been for decades a cornerstone of traumatic brain injury (TBI) management. Nevertheless, in recent years, its usefulness has been questioned in several reports. A group of neurosurgeons and neurointensivists met to openly discuss, and provide consensus on, practical applications of ICP in severe adult TBI.

Methods

A consensus conference was held in Milan on October 5, 2013, putting together neurosurgeons and intensivists with recognized expertise in treatment of TBI. Four topics have been selected and addressed in pro-con presentations: 1) ICP indications in diffuse brain injury, 2) cerebral contusions, 3) secondary decompressive craniectomy (DC), and 4) after evacuation of intracranial traumatic hematomas. The participants were asked to elaborate on the existing published evidence (without a systematic review) and their personal clinical experience. Based on the presentations and discussions of the conference, some drafts were circulated among the attendants. After remarks and further contributions were collected, a final document was approved by the participants.

Summary and conclusions

The group made the following recommendations: 1) in comatose TBI patients, in case of normal computed tomography (CT) scan, there is no indication for ICP monitoring; 2) ICP monitoring is indicated in comatose TBI patients with cerebral contusions in whom the interruption of sedation to check neurological status is dangerous and when the clinical examination is not completely reliable. The probe should be positioned on the side of the larger contusion; 3) ICP monitoring is generally recommended following a secondary DC in order to assess the effectiveness of DC in terms of ICP control and guide further therapy; 4) ICP monitoring after evacuation of an acute supratentorial intracranial hematoma should be considered for salvageable patients at increased risk of intracranial hypertension with particular perioperative features.

Keywords

Traumatic brain injuryIntracranial pressureMonitoringManagement

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nino Stocchetti
    • 1
  • Edoardo Picetti
    • 2
  • Maurizio Berardino
    • 3
  • Andràs Buki
    • 4
  • Randall M. Chesnut
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
  • Kostas N. Fountas
    • 8
  • Peter Horn
    • 9
  • Peter J. Hutchinson
    • 10
  • Corrado Iaccarino
    • 11
  • Angelos G. Kolias
    • 10
  • Lars-Owe Koskinen
    • 12
  • Nicola Latronico
    • 13
  • Andrews I. R. Maas
    • 14
  • Jean-François Payen
    • 15
  • Guy Rosenthal
    • 16
  • Juan Sahuquillo
    • 17
  • Stefano Signoretti
    • 18
  • Jean F. Soustiel
    • 19
  • Franco Servadei
    • 11
  1. 1.Department of Physiopathology and TransplantMilan University, Neuro ICU, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore PoliclinicoMilanItaly
  2. 2.Division of Anesthesia and Intensive CareAzienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di ParmaParmaItaly
  3. 3.Anesthesia and ICU, Orthopedic and Trauma Hospital, AOU Città della Salute e della ScienzaTurinItaly
  4. 4.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Pécs and Clinical Neuroscience Image Center of Hungarian Academy of Sciences (HAS)PécsHungary
  5. 5.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of Washington School of MedicineSeattleUSA
  6. 6.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of Washington School of MedicineSeattleUSA
  7. 7.University of Washington School of Global HealthSeattleUSA
  8. 8.Department of Neurosurgery School of MedicineUniversity of ThessalyLarissaGreece
  9. 9.Department of NeurosurgeryDr. Horst Schmidt Klinik (HSK)WiesbadenGermany
  10. 10.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical NeurosciencesAddenbrooke’s Hospital & University of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  11. 11.Division of Neurotraumatology-NeurosurgeryAzienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Parma, ASMN-IRCCS Reggio EmiliaParmaItaly
  12. 12.Department of NeurosurgeryUmeå University HospitalUmeåSweden
  13. 13.Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care MedicineUniversity of Brescia at Spedali CiviliBresciaItaly
  14. 14.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity Hospital AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  15. 15.Pôle Anesthésie-RéanimationCHU Grenoble, CS 10217Grenoble Cedex 9France
  16. 16.Department of NeurosurgeryHadassah-Hebrew University Medical CenterJerusalemIsrael
  17. 17.Department of Neurosurgery, Vall d’Hebron University HospitalUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  18. 18.Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Head and Neck SurgeryAzienda Ospedaliera S. Camillo-ForlaniniRomeItaly
  19. 19.Department of Neurosurgery, Galilee Medical Center, Faculty of MedicineBar Ilan UniversityNahariaIsrael