Acta Neurochirurgica

, 151:173

Isolated Whipple disease of the brain resembling a tumour

Authors

  • James L. Frazier
    • Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins Neuro-Oncology Surgical Outcomes Research LaboratoryJohns Hopkins School of Medicine
    • Brain Tumor Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Neurosurgery and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins Neuro-Oncology Surgical Outcomes Research LaboratoryJohns Hopkins School of Medicine
Brief Report of a Special Case

DOI: 10.1007/s00701-008-0180-6

Cite this article as:
Frazier, J.L. & Quinones-Hinojosa, A. Acta Neurochir (Wien) (2009) 151: 173. doi:10.1007/s00701-008-0180-6

Abstract

Introduction

Isolated Whipple disease of the central nervous system is a rare occurrence. Migratory arthralgias and gastrointestinal problems, including malabsorption, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss, are common presenting symptoms.

Discussion

For those patients with systemic signs and symptoms of Whipple disease, 6% to 43% will have clinically manifested CNS involvement that may include alterations in personality, ataxia, and dementia. We report our experience with a patient, who was successfully treated for Whipple disease 12 years prior to presentation and had a magnetic resonance image of the brain that revealed two solitary lesions resembling a tumor upon presentation.

Keywords

Whipple diseaseCentral nervous systemBrainWhipple’s bacilliTumour

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008