Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 284, Issue 3, pp 171–185

Extended phylogeny of Aquilegia: the biogeographical and ecological patterns of two simultaneous but contrasting radiations

  • Jesús M. Bastida
  • Julio M. Alcántara
  • Pedro J. Rey
  • Pablo Vargas
  • Carlos M. Herrera
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00606-009-0243-z

Cite this article as:
Bastida, J.M., Alcántara, J.M., Rey, P.J. et al. Plant Syst Evol (2010) 284: 171. doi:10.1007/s00606-009-0243-z

Abstract

Studies of the North American columbines (Aquilegia, Ranunculaceae) have supported the view that adaptive radiations in animal-pollinated plants proceed through pollinator specialisation and floral differentiation. However, although the diversity of pollinators and floral morphology is much lower in Europe and Asia than in North America, the number of columbine species is similar in the three continents. This supports the hypothesis that habitat and pollinator specialisation have contributed differently to the radiation of columbines in different continents. To establish the basic background to test this hypothesis, we expanded the molecular phylogeny of the genus to include a representative set of species from each continent. Our results suggest that the diversity of the genus is the result of two independent events of radiation, one involving Asiatic and North American species and the other involving Asiatic and European species. The ancestors of both lineages probably occupied the mountains of south-central Siberia. North American and European columbines are monophyletic within their respective lineages. The genus originated between 6.18 and 6.57 million years (Myr) ago, with the main pulses of diversification starting around 3 Myr ago both in Europe (1.25–3.96 Myr ago) and North America (1.42–5.01 Myr ago). The type of habitat occupied shifted more often in the Euroasiatic lineage, while pollination vectors shifted more often in the Asiatic-North American lineage. Moreover, while allopatric speciation predominated in the European lineage, sympatric speciation acted in the North American one. In conclusion, the radiation of columbines in Europe and North America involved similar rates of diversification and took place simultaneously and independently. However, the ecological drivers of radiation were different: geographic isolation and shifts in habitat use were more important in Europe while reproductive isolation linked to shifts in pollinator specialisation additionally acted in North America.

Keywords

Adaptive radiationAllopatric speciationColumbinesHabitat specialisationHistorical contingencyPollination syndromesSympatric speciation

Supplementary material

606_2009_243_MOESM1_ESM.doc (73 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 73 kb)
606_2009_243_MOESM2_ESM.doc (38 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 37 kb)
606_2009_243_MOESM3_ESM.doc (249 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOC 249 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jesús M. Bastida
    • 1
  • Julio M. Alcántara
    • 1
  • Pedro J. Rey
    • 1
  • Pablo Vargas
    • 2
  • Carlos M. Herrera
    • 3
  1. 1.Departamento de Biología Animal, Biología Vegetal y EcologíaUniversidad de JaénJaénSpain
  2. 2.Real Jardín BotánicoC.S.I.C.MadridSpain
  3. 3.Estación Biológica de DoñanaC.S.I.CSevillaSpain