Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 268, Issue 1, pp 209–234

Flower structure and development in Tupidanthus calyptratus (Araliaceae): an extreme case of polymery among asterids

  • D. D. Sokoloff
  • A. A. Oskolski
  • M. V. Remizowa
  • M. S. Nuraliev
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00606-007-0559-5

Cite this article as:
Sokoloff, D., Oskolski, A., Remizowa, M. et al. Plant Syst. Evol. (2007) 268: 209. doi:10.1007/s00606-007-0559-5
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Abstract

Flowers of Tupidanthus show an extreme case of floral polymery among asterids. Floral development and gynoecium structure have been examined. The floral meristem has a complex folded shape. The tiny calyx is initiated as a continuous ring primordium. The corolla is initiated as a lobed ring and develops into a calyptra. All stamen primordia appear simultaneously as a single whorl. The carpels, also in a single whorl, tend to alternate with the stamens. Some Schefflera species related to Tupidanthus are also studied. The flower of Tupidanthus is interpreted as a result of fasciation. Further investigation should determine whether mutation(s) in gene(s) of the CLAVATA family are responsible for the fasciation here. The significance of Tupidanthus for understanding spatial pattern formation in flowers of Araliaceae, and both functional and developmental constraints in angiosperm flowers with a single polymerous carpel whorl are discussed.

Keywords

AraliaceaedevelopmentevolutionfasciationflowerpolymeryScheffleraTupidanthus

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. D. Sokoloff
    • 1
  • A. A. Oskolski
    • 2
  • M. V. Remizowa
    • 1
  • M. S. Nuraliev
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Higher Plants, Biological FacultyMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Botanical MuseumV.L. Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia