European Spine Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 10, pp 1728–1734

Pre-existent vertebral rotation in the human spine is influenced by body position

Authors

  • Michiel M. A. Janssen
    • Department of Orthopaedics, G05.228University Medical Center Utrecht
  • Koen L. Vincken
    • Image Sciences InstituteUniversity Medical Center Utrecht
  • Bastiaan Kemp
    • Image Sciences InstituteUniversity Medical Center Utrecht
  • Marina Obradov
    • Department of RadiologySint Maartenskliniek
  • Marinus de Kleuver
    • Department of OrthopaedicsSint Maartenskliniek
  • Max A. Viergever
    • Image Sciences InstituteUniversity Medical Center Utrecht
    • Department of Orthopaedics, G05.228University Medical Center Utrecht
  • Lambertus W. Bartels
    • Image Sciences InstituteUniversity Medical Center Utrecht
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00586-010-1400-3

Cite this article as:
Janssen, M.M.A., Vincken, K.L., Kemp, B. et al. Eur Spine J (2010) 19: 1728. doi:10.1007/s00586-010-1400-3

Abstract

Both the humans as well as the quadrupedal spine have been shown to exhibit a pattern of pre-existent rotation that is similar in direction to what is found in the most common types of idiopathic scoliosis. It has been postulated that human bipedalism introduces forces to the spine that increase a tendency of the vertebrae to rotate. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of body position on vertebral rotation in vivo. Thirty asymptomatic volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning of the spine (T2–L5) in three different body positions; upright, quadrupedal-like (on hands-and-knees) and supine. Vertebral rotation in the local transverse plane was measured according to a pre-established method and compared at different spinal levels between the three body positions. It was shown that in all three positions the mid- and lower thoracic vertebrae were predominantly rotated to the right. However, vertebral rotation was significantly less in the quadrupedal position than in both the standing upright and supine positions.

Keywords

ScoliosisEtiologyHuman bipedalismUpright MRIVertebral rotationDorsally directed shear loads

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010