European Spine Journal

, Volume 17, Supplement 1, pp 14–23

A New Conceptual Model of Neck Pain

Linking Onset, Course, and Care: The Bone and Joint Decade 2000–2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders
  • Jaime Guzman
  • Eric L. Hurwitz
  • Linda J. Carroll
  • Scott Haldeman
  • Pierre Côté
  • Eugene J. Carragee
  • Paul M. Peloso
  • Gabrielle van der Velde
  • Lena W. Holm
  • Sheilah Hogg-Johnson
  • Margareta Nordin
  • J. David Cassidy
Conceptual Model

DOI: 10.1007/s00586-008-0621-1

Cite this article as:
Guzman, J., Hurwitz, E.L., Carroll, L.J. et al. Eur Spine J (2008) 17(Suppl 1): 14. doi:10.1007/s00586-008-0621-1

Study Design

Iterative discussion and consensus by a multidisciplinary task force scientific secretariat reviewing scientific evidence on neck pain and its associated disorders.

Objective

To provide an integrated model for linking the epidemiology of neck pain with its management and consequences, and to help organize and interpret existing knowledge, and to highlight gaps in the current literature.

Summary of Background Data

The wide variability of scientific and clinical approaches to neck pain described in the literature requires a unified conceptual model for appropriate interpretation of the research evidence.

Methods

The 12-member Scientific Secretariat of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000–2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders critically reviewed and eventually accepted as scientifically admissible a total of 552 scientific papers. The group met face-to-face on 18 occasions and had frequent additional telephone conference meetings over a 6-year period to discuss and interpret this literature and to agree on a conceptual model, which would accommodate findings. Models and definitions published in the scientific literature were discussed and repeatedly modified until the model and case definitions presented here were finally approved by the group.

Results

Our new conceptual model is centered on the person with neck pain or who is at risk for neck pain. Neck pain is viewed as an episodic occurrence over a lifetime with variable recovery between episodes. The model outlines the options available to individuals who are dealing with neck pain, along with factors that determine options, choices, and consequences. The short- and long-term impacts of neck pain are also considered. Finally, the model includes a 5-axis classification of neck pain studies based on how subjects were recruited into each study.

Conclusion

The Scientific Secretariat found the conceptual model helpful in interpreting the available scientific evidence. We believe it can assist people with neck pain, researchers, clinicians, and policy makers in framing their questions and decisions.

Keywords

neck painconceptual modelcoursehealth careimpactsmanagement

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jaime Guzman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 19
  • Eric L. Hurwitz
    • 3
  • Linda J. Carroll
    • 4
  • Scott Haldeman
    • 5
    • 6
  • Pierre Côté
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
  • Eugene J. Carragee
    • 11
    • 12
  • Paul M. Peloso
    • 13
  • Gabrielle van der Velde
    • 8
    • 9
    • 10
    • 14
  • Lena W. Holm
    • 15
  • Sheilah Hogg-Johnson
    • 9
    • 16
  • Margareta Nordin
    • 6
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
    • 14
    • 17
    • 18
  • J. David Cassidy
    • 7
    • 8
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of British ColumbiaColumbiaCanada
  2. 2.Occupational Health and Safety Agency for Healthcare in BCVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of Public Health Sciences, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawaii at MānoaHonoluluUSA
  4. 4.Department of Public Health Sciences, and the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, School of Public HealthUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA
  6. 6.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  7. 7.Departments of Public Health Sciences and Health Policy, Management and EvaluationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  8. 8.Division of Health Care and Outcomes ResearchToronto Western Research InstituteTorontoCanada
  9. 9.Institute for Work & HealthTorontoCanada
  10. 10.Centre of Research Expertise in Improved Disability Outcomes (CREIDO)University Health Network Rehabilitation Solutions, Toronto Western HospitalTorontoCanada
  11. 11.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  12. 12.Orthopaedic Spine Center and Spinal Surgery ServiceStanford University Hospital and ClinicsStanfordUSA
  13. 13.Endocrinology, Analgesia and InflammationMerck & Co.RahwayUSA
  14. 14.Department of Health Policy, Management and EvaluationUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  15. 15.Institute of Environmental MedicineKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  16. 16.Department of Public Health SciencesUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  17. 17.Departments of Orthopaedics and Environmental Medicine and Program of Ergonomics and Biomechanics, School of Medicine and Graduate School of Arts and ScienceNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  18. 18.Occupational and Industrial Orthopaedic Center (OIOC)New York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  19. 19.VancouverCanada