Mycorrhiza

, Volume 24, Issue 7, pp 487–499

In situ seed baiting to isolate germination-enhancing fungi for an epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium aphyllum (Orchidaceae)

Authors

  • Xiao-Meng Zi
    • Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
    • University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Chun-Ling Sheng
    • Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
    • University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
    • China Forestry Publishing House
  • Uromi Manage Goodale
    • Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
  • Shi-Cheng Shao
    • Center for Integrative Conservation, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
    • Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
    • Center for Integrative Conservation, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical GardenChinese Academy of Sciences
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00572-014-0565-8

Cite this article as:
Zi, X., Sheng, C., Goodale, U.M. et al. Mycorrhiza (2014) 24: 487. doi:10.1007/s00572-014-0565-8

Abstract

Orchid conservation efforts, using seeds and species-specific fungi that support seed germination, require the isolation, identification, and germination enhancement testing of symbiotic fungi. However, few studies have focused on developing such techniques for the epiphytes that constitute the majority of orchids. In this study, conducted in Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Yunnan, China, we used seeds of Dendrobium aphyllum, a locally endangered and medicinally valuable epiphytic orchid, to attract germination promoting fungi. Of the two fungi isolated from seed baiting, Tulasnella spp. and Trichoderma spp., Tulasnella, enhanced seed germination by 13.6 %, protocorm formation by 85.7 %, and seedling development by 45.2 % (all P < 0.0001). Epulorhiza, another seed germination promoting fungi isolated from Cymbidium mannii, also enhanced seed germination (6.5 %; P < 0.05) and protocorm formation (20.3 %; P < 0.0001), but Trichoderma suppressed seed germination by 26.4 % (P < 0.0001). Tulasnella was the only treatment that produced seedlings. Light increased seed imbibition, protocorm formation, and two-leaved seed development of Tulasnella inoculated seeds (P < 0.0001). Because the germination stage success was not dependent on fungi, we recommend that Tulasnella be introduced for facilitating D. aphyllum seed germination at the protocorm formation stage and that light be provided for increasing germination as well as further seedling development. Our findings suggest that in situ seed baiting can be used to isolate seed germination-enhancing fungi for the development of seedling production for conservation and reintroduction efforts of epiphytic orchids such as D. aphyllum.

Keywords

Dendrobium aphyllum Orchid conservation Seed baiting Symbiotic germination Tulasnella

Supplementary material

572_2014_565_MOESM1_ESM.docx (18 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 18 kb)
572_2014_565_MOESM2_ESM.docx (19 kb)
ESM 2 (DOCX 19 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014