Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 42, Issue 5, pp 346–351

Association of tannase-producing Staphylococcus lugdunensis with colon cancer and characterization of a novel tannase gene

Authors

  • Norihisa Noguchi
    • Department of Microbiology, School of PharmacyTokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science
  • Takashi Ohashi
    • Department of Microbiology, School of PharmacyTokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science
  • Taisei Shiratori
    • Department of GastroenterologyHachioji Medical Center of Tokyo Medical University
  • Koji Narui
    • Department of Microbiology, School of PharmacyTokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science
  • Tadashi Hagiwara
    • Department of GastroenterologyTokyo Medical University
  • Mari Ko
    • Department of GastroenterologyTokyo Medical University
  • Kiyoshi Watanabe
    • Hachioji Pharmaceutical Center
  • Takeo Miyahara
    • Department of GastroenterologyTokyo Medical University
  • Satoru Taira
    • Department of GastroenterologyTokyo Medical University
  • Fuminori Moriyasu
    • Department of GastroenterologyTokyo Medical University
  • Masanori Sasatsu
    • Department of Microbiology, School of PharmacyTokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science
Alimentary Tract

DOI: 10.1007/s00535-007-2012-5

Cite this article as:
Noguchi, N., Ohashi, T., Shiratori, T. et al. J Gastroenterol (2007) 42: 346. doi:10.1007/s00535-007-2012-5

Abstract

Background

The relationship between Streptococcus (St.) bovis endocarditis and colon cancer is well known. In St. bovis, the biotype I strain (formerly, St. gallolyticus) produces tannase that degrades tannins. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of tannase-producing bacteria with colon cancer, and to identify the major tannase-producing bacteria and the gene involved.

Methods

Tannase-producing bacteria were isolated in tannic acid-treated selective agar medium from feces and rectal swabs of 357 patients who underwent colon endoscopy from 1999 to 2004.

Results

Tannase-producing bacteria were isolated more frequently from the colon cancer group (24.3%) than from the adenoma or normal groups (14.4%; P < 0.05). S. gallolyticus, Staphylococcus (S.) lugdunensis, Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum, and L. pentosus were all identified as tannase-producing bacteria. Of these, S. lugdunensis was significantly isolated from the advanced-stage cancer group (22.2%; P < 0.001) more than from the early-stage cancer (8.6%) or adenoma (4.9%) groups. The gene (tanA) for tannase in S. lugdunensis was cloned and sequenced. The tanA gene was associated with all S. lugdunensis but not with other bacteria by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction.

Conclusions

Tannase-producing S. lugdunensis is associated with advanced-stage colon cancer, and the tanA gene is a useful marker for the detection of S. lugdunensis.

Key words

tannase genesStaphylococcus lugdunensiscolon cancerStreptococcus bovis

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Tokyo 2007