Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 88–95

Delayed emesis: incidence, pattern, prognostic factors and optimal treatment

  • Fausto Roila
  • Donatella Donati
  • Stefano Tamberi
  • Guido Margutti
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s005200100295

Cite this article as:
Roila, F., Donati, D., Tamberi, S. et al. Support Care Cancer (2002) 10: 88. doi:10.1007/s005200100295

Abstract

Delayed emesis has been arbitrarily defined as vomiting and/or nausea beginning, or persisting for, more than 24 h after chemotherapy administration. Acute emesis is the most important prognostic factor for delayed emesis. Owing to the relatively high incidence and severity all patients treated with cisplatin ≥50 mg/m2 should receive antiemetic prophylaxis. In these patients a combination of dexamethasone plus metoclopramide or a 5-HT3 antagonist is the most efficacious regimen. All patients submitted to moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, carboplatin, doxorubicin and epirubicin, should also receive antiemetic prophylaxis with oral dexamethasone to prevent delayed emesis.

Delayed emesis Antiemetic prophylaxis 5-HT3 antagonists Dexamethasone Metoclopramide

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fausto Roila
    • 1
  • Donatella Donati
    • 1
  • Stefano Tamberi
    • 1
  • Guido Margutti
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Oncology Division, Arcispedale S. Anna, FerraraItaly
  2. 2.Policlinico Hospital, Via Brunamonti, 06122 PerugiaItaly