Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 22, Issue 5, pp 1409–1415

How long do the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes persist in cancer patients?

Authors

  • Jessica W. Frisk
    • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineLinköping University
    • Clinical Department of Surgery, VHN, County Council ÖstergötlandLinköping University
  • Mats L. Hammar
    • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineLinköping University
  • Martin Ingvar
    • Osher Center for Intergrative Medicine, Department of Clinical NeuroscienceKarolinska Institutet
    • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineLinköping University
    • Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity Hospital of Linköping
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00520-014-2126-2

Cite this article as:
Frisk, J.W., Hammar, M.L., Ingvar, M. et al. Support Care Cancer (2014) 22: 1409. doi:10.1007/s00520-014-2126-2

Abstract

Purpose

Acupuncture has been suggested as therapy for hot flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. In this systematic review, we sought to evaluate the long-term effects on vasomotor symptoms after the end of a defined treatment period of acupuncture in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer.

Methods

A literature search revealed 222 articles within the field. With defined exclusion criteria, we identified 17 studies. We also used the Jadad quality score and identified seven studies with a score of at least 3.

Results

Six of seven identified studies qualified for inclusion in an analysis that measured frequency of hot flashes weighted in relation to number of patients (n = 172). The average reduction from baseline to end of acupuncture (ranging between 5 and 12 weeks of treatment) showed 43.2 % reduction of hot flashes. At the last follow-up (mean 5.8 months, range 3–9 months) after the end of therapy, the weighted reduction from baseline was sustained at 45.6 % in the 153 of 172 patients (89 %) who were followed up.

Conclusions

Data from six prospective analyzed studies indicate at least 3-month effects after the end of acupuncture treatment for flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. However, larger randomized trials with long-term follow-up will be needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

Keywords

AcupunctureBreast neoplasmProstatic cancerHot flashes

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014