Original Article

Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 495-502

First online:

Physical activity preferences of early-stage lung cancer survivors

  • Errol J. PhilipAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Email author 
  • , Elliot J. CoupsAffiliated withThe Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • , Marc B. FeinsteinAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • , Bernard J. ParkAffiliated withDepartment of Surgery, Hackensack University Medical Center
  • , Donna J. WilsonAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • , Jamie S. OstroffAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

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Abstract

Purpose

Engagement in physical activity can provide important benefits for cancer patients and survivors, including those diagnosed with lung cancer. Despite this, many survivors do not engage in recommended levels of physical activity and little is known about the obstacles encountered by lung cancer survivors. The current study examines the physical activity preferences of early-stage lung cancer survivors.

Method

As part of a larger survey study, 175 non-small cell lung cancer survivors who were on average 3.6 years from surgical treatment responded to questions regarding their preferences for physical activity and physical activity advice. Demographic and medical characteristics were also collected.

Results

The majority of respondents (62 %) reported a desire to receive advice regarding physical activity, predominantly before treatment (68 %), in face-to-face interactions (95 %) with a physician (80 %), and within the context of a cancer care center (92 %). Approximately half of participants indicated they would be interested in an exercise program tailored to lung cancer survivors and most individuals (73 %) reported feeling capable of engaging in an exercise program. Differences in physical activity preferences emerged based on demographic and disease characteristics.

Conclusions

The majority of participants reported a desire for physical activity advice and a willingness to engage in physical activity. Important differences were found based on demographic and medical characteristics, which may warrant consideration in the development and dissemination of physical activity interventions for this cancer survivor population.

Keywords

Lung cancer Physical activity preferences Survivorship