Supportive Care in Cancer

, Volume 21, Issue 10, pp 2707–2717

Developing competencies for multidisciplinary hospice and palliative care professionals in Korea

Authors

  • Jina Kang
    • Hospice & Palliative Care BranchNational Cancer Center
    • Hospice & Palliative Care BranchNational Cancer Center
    • Family Medicine Clinic, National Cancer Center
    • Department of Symptom ResearchThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Yang Suk Yoo
    • College of Nursing, The Catholic University
  • Jin Young Choi
    • Hospice & Palliative Care BranchNational Cancer Center
  • Su Jin Koh
    • Palliative Care Unit of Cancer CenterGood Samaritan Hospital
  • Hyun Jung Jho
    • Family Medicine Clinic, National Cancer Center
  • Youn Seon Choi
    • Department of Family MedicineKorea University Guro Hospital
  • Jeanno Park
    • Palliative Care and Hospice CenterBobath Memorial Hospital
  • Do Ho Moon
    • Department of Internal MedicineSihwa General Hospital
  • Do Yeun Kim
    • Division of Hematology and Medical OncologyDongguk University Ilsan Hospital
  • Yun Jung
    • College of Nursing, The Catholic University
  • Won Chul Kim
    • Medical Social Services TeamKorea University Guro hospital
  • Seung Hee Lim
    • Department of Social WelfareHanbuk University
  • Seung Joo Hwang
    • Department of Family MedicineShin Cheon Union Hospital
  • Sang Ok Choe
    • Seoul, Dong Sung High school
  • Desiree Jones
    • Department of Symptom ResearchThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00520-013-1850-3

Cite this article as:
Kang, J., Kim, Y., Yoo, Y.S. et al. Support Care Cancer (2013) 21: 2707. doi:10.1007/s00520-013-1850-3

Abstract

Purpose

Competency-based assessment helps to improve performance and to standardize education programs for hospice and palliative care professionals. This paper aims to report the process and results of developing the hospice and palliative care competencies by multidisciplinary experts in Korea.

Methods

The competency development task force team of Korean hospice and palliative care professionals was comprised of seven physicians, four nurses, two social workers, and two clergy. To build consensus regarding competencies, the team performed a two-round Delphi survey. The importance of competency domains was assessed by using a 5-point Likert scale. After the completion of the Delphi survey, final competency domains were decided in a consensus meeting.

Results

The competencies were composed of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The competency domains were identified as the following: 11 domains and 16 subdomains for physicians, 11 domains for nurses, 5 domains and 15 subdomains for social workers, as well as 3 domains and 5 subdomains for spiritual care providers. The high importance domains were different by specialties. Physical care and treatment for physicians, symptom management for nurses, bereavement care for social workers, and communication for spiritual care providers were ranked as highly important. For nurses and spiritual care providers, attitude-related domains were ranked the highest in importance.

Conclusion

The competencies developed by multidisciplinary professionals are useful to identify the appropriate roles of each hospice and palliative care specialist involved in a team approach to patient care.

Keywords

CompetencyHospicePalliative careDelphi surveyEducation

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013