Temperature variation and emergency hospital admissions for stroke in Brisbane, Australia, 1996–2005

  • Xiao Yu Wang
  • Adrian G. Barnett
  • Wenbiao Hu
  • Shilu Tong
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00484-009-0241-4

Cite this article as:
Wang, X.Y., Barnett, A.G., Hu, W. et al. Int J Biometeorol (2009) 53: 535. doi:10.1007/s00484-009-0241-4

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of disability and death. This study evaluated the association between temperature variation and emergency admissions for stroke in Brisbane, Australia. Daily emergency admissions for stroke, meteorologic and air pollution data were obtained for the period of January 1996 to December 2005. The relative risk of emergency admissions for stroke was estimated with a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model. For primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PIH) emergency admissions, the average daily PIH for the group aged < 65 increased by 15% [95% confidence interval (CI): 5, 26%] and 12% (95% CI: 2, 22%) for a 1°C increase in daily maximum temperature and minimum temperature in summer, respectively, after controlling for potential confounding effects of humidity and air pollutants. For ischemic stroke (IS) emergency admissions, the average daily IS for the group aged ≥ 65 decreased by 3% (95% CI: −6, 0%) for a 1°C increase in daily maximum temperature in winter after adjustment for confounding factors. Temperature variation was significantly associated with emergency admissions for stroke, and its impact varied with different type of stroke. Health authorities should pay greater attention to possible increasing emergency care for strokes when temperature changes, in both summer and winter.

Keywords

Emergency admissions Season Stroke Temperature 

Copyright information

© ISB 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiao Yu Wang
    • 1
  • Adrian G. Barnett
    • 1
  • Wenbiao Hu
    • 1
  • Shilu Tong
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Public HealthQueensland University of TechnologyKelvin GroveAustralia

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