International Journal of Biometeorology

, Volume 47, Issue 4, pp 202–212

The European Phenology Network

  • Arnold J. H. van Vliet
  • Rudolf S. de Groot
  • Yvette Bellens
  • Peter Braun
  • Robert Bruegger
  • Ekko Bruns
  • Jan Clevers
  • Christine Estreguil
  • Michael Flechsig
  • François Jeanneret
  • Marta Maggi
  • Pim Martens
  • Bettina Menne
  • Annette Menzel
  • Tim Sparks
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00484-003-0174-2

Cite this article as:
van Vliet, A.J.H., de Groot, R.S., Bellens, Y. et al. Int J Biometeorol (2003) 47: 202. doi:10.1007/s00484-003-0174-2

Abstract

The analysis of changes in the timing of life cycle-events of organisms (phenology) has been able to contribute significantly to the assessment of potential impacts of climate change on ecology. These phenological responses of species to changes in climate are likely to have significant relevance for socio-economic issues such as agriculture, forestry and human health and have proven able to play a role in raising environmental awareness and education on climate change. This paper presents the European Phenology Network (EPN), which aims to increase the efficiency, added value and use of phenological monitoring and research, and to promote the practical use of phenological data in assessing the impact of global (climate) change and possible adaptation measures. The paper demonstrates that many disciplines have to deal with changes in the timing of life-cycle events in response to climate change and that many different user groups are involved. Furthermore, it shows how EPN addresses issues such as (1) raising public awareness and education, (2) the integration and co-operation of existing observing systems, (3) integration and access to phenological information and (4) communication.

Keywords

Climate changeEcologyAgricultureHuman healthForestryCommunication

Copyright information

© ISB 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold J. H. van Vliet
    • 1
  • Rudolf S. de Groot
    • 1
  • Yvette Bellens
    • 2
  • Peter Braun
    • 3
  • Robert Bruegger
    • 4
  • Ekko Bruns
    • 5
  • Jan Clevers
    • 6
  • Christine Estreguil
    • 7
  • Michael Flechsig
    • 8
  • François Jeanneret
    • 4
  • Marta Maggi
    • 7
  • Pim Martens
    • 9
  • Bettina Menne
    • 10
  • Annette Menzel
    • 11
  • Tim Sparks
    • 12
  1. 1.Environmental Systems Analysis Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 8080, 6700 DD, Wageningen, The Netherlands
  2. 2.SME-Milieuadviseurs (GLOBE-The Netherlands), The Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Agricultural Sciences, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark
  4. 4.Institute of Geography, University of Berne, Switzerland
  5. 5.German Weather Service, Germany
  6. 6.Centre for Geoinformation, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
  7. 7.Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Italy
  8. 8.Department of Data and Computation, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany
  9. 9.International Centre for Integrative Studies, The Netherlands
  10. 10.World Health Organisation, Italy
  11. 11.Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie, Technical University Munich, Germany
  12. 12.Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Monks Wood, United Kingdom