Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 401–408

Primary hypertension and neurocognitive and executive functioning in school-age children

  • Juan C. Kupferman
  • Marc B. Lande
  • Heather R. Adams
  • Steven G. Pavlakis
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00467-012-2215-8

Cite this article as:
Kupferman, J.C., Lande, M.B., Adams, H.R. et al. Pediatr Nephrol (2013) 28: 401. doi:10.1007/s00467-012-2215-8

Abstract

Data on neurocognitive function in hypertensive children are limited. In this review, we summarize recent preliminary, early studies that suggest that children with elevated blood pressure demonstrate evidence of worse performance on direct neurocognitive testing, as well as evidence of executive dysfunction based on parent ratings, compared with matched normotensive comparison groups. Furthermore, hypertensive children may have increased prevalence of learning disabilities as well as a blunted cerebrovascular reactivity compared with normotensive controls. Larger, prospective studies are needed to confirm and further explore these emerging but preliminary findings.

Keywords

CognitionElevated blood pressureBrainPediatricExecutive functionMemory

Copyright information

© IPNA 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juan C. Kupferman
    • 1
  • Marc B. Lande
    • 2
  • Heather R. Adams
    • 3
  • Steven G. Pavlakis
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of PediatricsMaimonides Medical CenterBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Golisano Children’s HospitalUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Division of Child Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Golisano Children’s HospitalUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  4. 4.Center for Brain and BehaviorMaimonides Medical CenterBrooklynUSA