Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 26, Issue 12, pp 2211–2217

Ambulatory blood pressure status in children: comparing alternate limit sources

  • Cynthia S. Bell
  • Tim S. Poffenbarger
  • Joshua A. Samuels
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00467-011-1972-0

Cite this article as:
Bell, C.S., Poffenbarger, T.S. & Samuels, J.A. Pediatr Nephrol (2011) 26: 2211. doi:10.1007/s00467-011-1972-0
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Abstract

The American Heart Association has included alternate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) limits for children published by Wühl in 2002. These updated limits employ the same pediatric cohort data as the previous ABP limits published by Soergel in 1997 but differ in analysis technique. The implications of changing ABP limit source on the diagnosis of hypertension has yet to be examined in a large pediatric cohort. We reviewed 741 ABP monitorings performed in children referred to our hypertension clinic between 1991–2007. Hypertension was defined as 24-h mean blood pressure ≥ 95th percentile or 24-h blood pressure load ≥25%, by Soergel and Wühl limits separately. Six hundred seventy-three (91%) children were classified the same by both limit sources. Wühl limits were more likely than Soergel to classify a child as hypertensive (443 vs. 409, respectively). There was an increased classification of prehypertension and decreased white-coat hypertension by the Wühl method, whereas ambulatory and severe hypertension counts remained relatively the same by both limits sources. The use of either limit source will not significantly affect most clinical outcomes but should remain consistent over long-term research projects. Collection of new normative data from a larger, multiethnic population is needed for better measurement of ABP in children.

Keywords

Ambulatory blood pressurePediatric hypertensionThresholdsNormative percentiles

Copyright information

© IPNA 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia S. Bell
    • 1
  • Tim S. Poffenbarger
    • 1
  • Joshua A. Samuels
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Nephrology and HypertensionUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at HoustonHoustonUSA