Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 131–138

The impact of dialysis solution biocompatibility on ultrafiltration and on free water transport in rats

  • Gaëlle Aubertin
  • Philippe Choquet
  • Céline Dheu
  • André Constantinesco
  • Charline Ratomponirina
  • Ariane Zaloszyc
  • Jutta Passlick-Deetjen
  • Michel Fischbach
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00467-011-1945-3

Cite this article as:
Aubertin, G., Choquet, P., Dheu, C. et al. Pediatr Nephrol (2012) 27: 131. doi:10.1007/s00467-011-1945-3

Abstract

This study compares different peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) in rats over a short contact time. For greater accuracy, net ultrafiltration (UF) and peritoneal transport indices, mass transfer area coefficient (MTAC) were scaled for the in vivo peritoneal surface area recruited (ivPSA) measured by microcomputerized tomography. Wistar rats underwent nephrectomy (5/6ths), were randomized into two groups and given 1.5% glucose PDF, either conventional acidic lactate (n = 14) or pH neutral bicarbonate (BicaVera) (n = 13); MTAC and UF were measured using a 90-min peritoneal equilibrium test (PET), fill volume (IPV) of 10 ml/100 g; small pore fluid transport was determined from sodium balance and used to calculate free water transport (FWT). Each ivPSA value was significantly correlated with the actual IPV, which varied from one rat to another. At 90 min of contact, there was no difference in recruited ivPSA in relation to PDFs. There was a difference (p < 0.01) in net UF/ivPSA 0.45 vs. 1.41 cm2/ml for bicarbonate versus lactate, as there was in the proportion of FWT with bicarbonate (42 ± 5% of net UF) compared to lactate (29 ± 4% of net UF). Net UF for individual values of ivPSA differs between conventional PDF and more biocompatible solutions, such as bicarbonate PDF. This observed change in UF cannot be fully explained by differences in glucose transport. The changes in FWT may be explained by the impact of the PDF biocompatibility on aquaporin function.

Keywords

Peritoneal dialysis solutionBicarbonateLactateFree water transportAquaporin functionNet ultrafiltrationAnimalsMicroCTPeritoneal surface area

Copyright information

© IPNA 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gaëlle Aubertin
    • 1
  • Philippe Choquet
    • 1
  • Céline Dheu
    • 2
  • André Constantinesco
    • 1
  • Charline Ratomponirina
    • 3
  • Ariane Zaloszyc
    • 2
  • Jutta Passlick-Deetjen
    • 4
  • Michel Fischbach
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Service de biophysique et médecine nucléaire – Institut de Mécanique des fluides et des Solides CNRS Université de StrasbourgCHU HautepierreStrasbourg CedexFrance
  2. 2.Service de Pédiatrie 1CHU HautepierreStrasbourg CedexFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biologie MoléculaireCHU HautepierreStrasbourg CedexFrance
  4. 4.Department of NephrologyUniversity Hospital DüsseldorfDuesseldorfGermany
  5. 5.Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation Children’s UnitUniversity Hospital HautepierreStrasbourgFrance