Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 27, Issue 10, pp 3781–3791

200 Consecutive laparoscopic pancreatic resections performed with a robotically controlled laparoscope holder

  • Andrew A. Gumbs
  • Roland Croner
  • Angel Rodriguez
  • Noah Zuker
  • Aristoteles Perrakis
  • Brice Gayet
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00464-013-2969-5

Cite this article as:
Gumbs, A.A., Croner, R., Rodriguez, A. et al. Surg Endosc (2013) 27: 3781. doi:10.1007/s00464-013-2969-5

Abstract

Introduction

Because of the potential benefit of robotics in pancreatic surgery, we review our experience at two minimally invasive pancreatic surgery centers that utilize a robotically controlled laparoscope holder to see if smaller robots that enable the operating surgeon to maintain contact with the patient may have a role in the treatment of pancreatic disease.

Methods

From March 1994 to June 2011, a total of 200 laparoscopic pancreatic procedures utilizing a robotically controlled laparoscope holder were performed.

Results

A total of 72 duodenopancreatectomies, 67 distal pancreatectomies, 23 enucleations, 20 pancreatic cyst drainage procedures, 5 necrosectomies, 5 atypical pancreatic resections, 4 total pancreatectomies, and 4 central pancreatectomies were performed. Fourteen patients required conversion to an open approach and eight a hand-assisted one. A total of 24 patients suffered a major complication. Sixteen patients developed a pancreatic leak and 19 patients required reoperation. Major complications occurred in 14 patients and pancreatic leaks occurred in 13 patients. Ten patients required conversion to a lap-assisted or open approach and six patients required reoperation.

Conclusions

Currently, a robotically assisted approach using a camera holder seems the only way to incorporate some of the benefits of robotics in pancreatic surgery while maintaining haptics and contact with the patient.

Keywords

Pancreato bilioInstrumentsGIHuman/robotic

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew A. Gumbs
    • 1
  • Roland Croner
    • 2
  • Angel Rodriguez
    • 3
  • Noah Zuker
    • 4
  • Aristoteles Perrakis
    • 2
  • Brice Gayet
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Surgical OncologySummit Medical GroupBerkeley HeightsUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity Hospital ErlangenErlangenGermany
  3. 3.Department of Surgical OncologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  4. 4.Department of Digestive DiseasesInstitut Mutualiste Montsouris, University Paris VParisFrance