Surgical Endoscopy

, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp 1754–1760

Early outcomes of antireflux surgery for United States lung transplant recipients

  • Arman Kilic
  • Ashish S. Shah
  • Christian A. Merlo
  • Christine G. Gourin
  • Anne O. Lidor
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00464-012-2674-9

Cite this article as:
Kilic, A., Shah, A.S., Merlo, C.A. et al. Surg Endosc (2013) 27: 1754. doi:10.1007/s00464-012-2674-9

Abstract

Background

This study aimed to evaluate early outcomes after antireflux surgery for lung transplant (LTx) recipients in the United States.

Methods

Adult patients undergoing elective antireflux surgery between 2003 and 2008 were identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. A propensity-matched analysis compared early outcomes between prior LTx recipients and well-matched control subjects consisting of non-LTx patients undergoing elective antireflux surgery during the same era. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality, and the secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS), perioperative complications, and hospital costs.

Results

During the study period, 401 LTx recipients underwent elective antireflux surgery. These patients were well matched with 401 control patients in terms of age, sex, individual and overall comorbidity burden, hospital teaching status, hospital location, hospital antireflux volume, and open versus laparoscopic approach. The overall operative mortality rate was 1.4 %, with no difference between the groups. The overall and individual morbidity rates also were similar. The LOS and hospital costs were significantly greater in the LTx group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis confirmed that prior LTx did not confer an increased risk of inpatient mortality after antireflux surgery.

Conclusions

To date, this is the largest study to examine outcomes of antireflux surgery for LTx recipients. Operative mortality and morbidity appear to be comparable with those of the general population, although resource utilization is greater. Based on these data, trials to evaluate the role of antireflux surgery in preserving allograft function after LTx should not be hindered by a perceived notion of prohibitive operative risk in this patient population.

Keywords

ComplicationsCostsEsophagealGERDPulmonary (lungs)Transplantation

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arman Kilic
    • 1
  • Ashish S. Shah
    • 1
  • Christian A. Merlo
    • 2
  • Christine G. Gourin
    • 3
  • Anne O. Lidor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryThe Johns Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of OtolaryngologyThe Johns Hopkins Medical InstitutionsBaltimoreUSA