, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 98-107

Risk factors for delayed bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric neoplasm

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Background

Delayed bleeding is one of the major complications of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The aim of this study is to determine the incidence rate and clinical factors associated with delayed bleeding¸ as well as the time interval between bleeding and ESD for gastric neoplasm.

Methods

We investigated 647 lesions in 582 consecutive patients undergoing ESD for gastric neoplasm.

Results

Delayed bleeding after ESD was evident in all 28 lesions from 28 patients (4.33% of all specimens, 4.81% of patients), and all achieved endoscopic hemostasis. Resected specimen width (≥40 mm) was the only significant factor associated with delayed bleeding on univariate and multivariate analysis. In early delayed bleeding (bleeding occurring on or before the fourth postoperative day), wide resected specimen and tumor location in the lower third of the stomach were significant risk factors. In late delayed bleeding (bleeding occurring after the fifth operative day), wide resected specimen, tumor location in the middle third of the stomach, hypertension, and high body mass index (≥25 kg/m2) were significant factors. Delayed bleeding in patients with tumors in the upper and middle third of the stomach (median 8.0 days; range 1–20 days) occurred significantly later as compared with patients who had tumors in the lower third (median 2.0 days; range 1–34 days).

Conclusions

Risk factors for delayed bleeding, and the probable underlying mechanism involved, differed depending on the time elapsed between surgery and the bleeding episode.