Surgical Endoscopy And Other Interventional Techniques

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 688–691

140 consecutive cases of minimally invasive, radio-guided parathyroidectomy

  • M. Shabtai
  • M. Ben-Haim
  • Y. Muntz
  • I. Vered
  • D. Rosin
  • J. Kuriansky
  • O. Zmora
  • D. Olchovski
  • A. Ayalon
  • S. T. Zwas
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00464-002-9198-7

Cite this article as:
Shabtai, M., Ben-Haim, M., Muntz, Y. et al. Surg Endosc (2003) 17: 688. doi:10.1007/s00464-002-9198-7

Abstract

Background: The advent of highly accurate parathyroid imaging and the ever-increasing trend towards minimally invasive procedures have changed considerably the surgical approach to the patient with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) caused by a single parathyroid adenoma. This study analyzes the short- and longer-term results of 140 patients who underwent minimally invasive, radio-guided parathyroidectomy. Methods: Demographic, clinical, and pre-operative imaging data, operative findings, and short- and long-term results of 140 consecutive patients operated within a 20 months period (8/1999–4/2002), were prospectively entered into a database. Immediate pre-operative sestamibi scintigraphy with skin marking of focal adenoma uptake were followed by intraoperative hand-held gamma probe for the removal of the parathyroid adenoma by unilateral minimal access surgery. Preoperative and surgical data were analyzed and correlated to outcomes, measured by success or failure to cure PHPT, associated morbidity and mortality, predictive value of localizing studies, and postoperative laboratory results in the immediate as well as long-term period. Results: 140 patients, mean age: 55.1 ± 14.1 years (range 19–88 years), female to male ratio 94:46 with PHPT proven by concomitantly elevated serum calcium and parathormone (PTH) levels, with a single adenoma identified by sestamibi single photon emission tomography (SPECT) scintigraphy and high-resolution sonography, underwent minimally invasive, radio-guided parathyroidectomy. Mean serum levels of preoperative calcium, phosphorus, and PTH were 11.6 ± 0.8 mg/dL (range 9.1–14), 3.0 ± 0.3 mg/dL, and 147.1 ± 94.3 pg/mL (range 68–784), respectively. Overall, in 3 out of 140 patients (2.1%), focused, minimally invasive surgery failed to identify and remove the adenoma. Positive predictive value when both localizing modalities concurred was 99.2%. Positive predictive value of SPECT scan alone was 97.2%. Overall success rate was 97.8% (137/140). 24 hours postoperative mean serum calcium was 9.2 ± 0.8 mg/dL and at 6 months mean serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH were 9.4 ± 1.06 mg/dL, 3.2 ± 0.8 mg/dL, and 32.1 ± 11.9 pg/mL, respectively (p = 0.0001). There was no mortality. In 2 patients (1.4%) there was transient vocal cord paresis and there were 8 instances of clinically significant hypocalcemia. In 3 cases (2.1%), a second adenoma manifested itself 9–14 months following surgery and was removed by minimal access procedure. Conclusions: Minimally invasive, radio-guided focused parathyroidectomy for a single adenoma is safe and effective in curing hyperparathyroidism with a 97% success rate. A second adenoma occurring in less than 3% may be successfully treated with a second minimal access operation. The combined positive predictive value of concurring sestamibi SPECT scintigraphy and sonography of 99.2% may increase success rate, and thus implementing this technique in patients with concurring sonography and scintigraphy may be advocated.

Keywords

ParathyroidectomyParathyroid adenomaMinimally invasive

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Shabtai
    • 1
  • M. Ben-Haim
    • 1
  • Y. Muntz
    • 1
  • I. Vered
    • 1
  • D. Rosin
    • 1
  • J. Kuriansky
    • 1
  • O. Zmora
    • 1
  • D. Olchovski
    • 1
  • A. Ayalon
    • 1
  • S. T. Zwas
    • 1
  1. 1.Sheba Medical CenterSackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv UniversityIsrael