Dysphagia

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 16–25

Standardized Instrument for Lingual Pressure Measurement

Authors

  • Angela Hewitt
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical CenterWilliam S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital
  • Jacqueline Hind
    • Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical CenterWilliam S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital
  • Stephanie Kays
    • Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical CenterWilliam S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital
  • Mark Nicosia
    • Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical CenterWilliam S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of Minnesota
  • John Doyle
    • Department of SurgeryUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Willis Tompkins
    • Department of Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ronald Gangnon
    • Department of Biostatistics and Medical InformaticsUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Department of MedicineUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison
    • Geriatric Research Educational and Clinical CenterWilliam S. Middleton Memorial VA Hospital
    • William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00455-007-9089-0

Cite this article as:
Hewitt, A., Hind, J., Kays, S. et al. Dysphagia (2008) 23: 16. doi:10.1007/s00455-007-9089-0

Abstract

Disease-related atrophy of the tongue muscles can lead to diminished lingual strength and swallowing difficulties. The devastating physical and social consequences resulting from this condition of oropharyngeal dysphagia have prompted investigators to study the effects of tongue exercise in improving lingual strength. We developed the Madison Oral Strengthening Therapeutic (MOST) device, which provides replicable mouth placement, portability, affordability, and a simple user interface. Our study (1) compared the MOST to the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI), a commercial pressure-measuring device, and (2) identified the optimal tongue pressure sampling rate for isometric exercises. While initial use of the MOST is focused on evaluating and treating swallowing problems, it is anticipated that its greatest impact will be the prevention of lingual muscle mass and related strength diminishment, which occurs even in the exponentially increasing population of healthy aging adults.

Keywords

DysphagiaExerciseSampling rateTongue strengthTongue pressureBiofeedbackDeglutitionDeglutition disorders

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007