Bulletin of Volcanology

, 76:814

Coupling eruption and tsunami records: the Krakatau 1883 case study, Indonesia

  • Raphaël Paris
  • Patrick Wassmer
  • Franck Lavigne
  • Alexander Belousov
  • Marina Belousova
  • Yan Iskandarsyah
  • Mhammed Benbakkar
  • Budianto Ontowirjo
  • Nelly Mazzoni
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00445-014-0814-x

Cite this article as:
Paris, R., Wassmer, P., Lavigne, F. et al. Bull Volcanol (2014) 76: 814. doi:10.1007/s00445-014-0814-x

Abstract

The well-documented 1883 eruption of Krakatau volcano (Indonesia) offers an opportunity to couple the eruption’s history with the tsunami record. The aim of this paper is not to re-analyse the scenario for the 1883 eruption but to demonstrate that the study of tsunami deposits provides information for reconstructing past eruptions. Indeed, though the characteristics of volcanogenic tsunami deposits are similar to those of other tsunami deposits, they may include juvenile material (e.g. fresh pumice) or be interbedded with distal pyroclastic deposits (ash fall, surges), due to their simultaneity with the eruption. Five kinds of sedimentary and volcanic facies related to the 1883 events were identified along the coasts of Java and Sumatra: (1) bioclastic tsunami sands and (2) pumiceous tsunami sands, deposited respectively before and during the Plinian phase (26–27 August); (3) rounded pumice lapilli reworked by tsunami; (4) pumiceous ash fall deposits and (5) pyroclastic surge deposits (only in Sumatra). The stratigraphic record on the coasts of Java and Sumatra, which agrees particularly well with observations of the 1883 events, is tentatively linked to the proximal stratigraphy of the eruption.

Keywords

Volcanic tsunamiTsunami deposits1883 Krakatau eruptionPyroclastic fallPyroclastic surgeIndonesia

Supplementary material

445_2014_814_MOESM1_ESM.docx (22 kb)
Table S1(DOCX 21 kb)
445_2014_814_MOESM2_ESM.docx (20 kb)
Table S2(DOCX 19 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raphaël Paris
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrick Wassmer
    • 3
    • 4
  • Franck Lavigne
    • 3
    • 5
  • Alexander Belousov
    • 6
  • Marina Belousova
    • 6
  • Yan Iskandarsyah
    • 7
    • 8
  • Mhammed Benbakkar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Budianto Ontowirjo
    • 11
  • Nelly Mazzoni
    • 9
    • 10
  1. 1.Clermont UniversitéUniversité Blaise PascalClermont-FerrandFrance
  2. 2.Magmas et VolcansCNRS, UMR 6524Clermont-FerrandFrance
  3. 3.UMR 8591, Laboratoire de Géographie PhysiqueCNRSMeudonFrance
  4. 4.Faculté de Géographie et d’AménagementUniversité de StrasbourgStrasbourgFrance
  5. 5.Université Paris 1 Panthéon-SorbonnePRES HESAMMeudonFrance
  6. 6.Institute of Volcanology and SeismologyPetropavlosk-KamchatskyRussia
  7. 7.Laboratorium Geologi Lingkungan dan Hidrogeologi, Fakultas Teknik GeologiUniversitas Padjadjaran (UNPAD)BandungIndonesia
  8. 8.Laboratoire Image, Ville, Environnement (LIVE), UMR 7362 CNRSUniversité de StrasbourgStrasbourgFrance
  9. 9.Clermont Université, GEOLABUniversité Blaise PascalClermont-FerrandFrance
  10. 10.GEOLABUMR 6042, CNRSClermont-FerrandFrance
  11. 11.BPDP BPPTJakartaIndonesia