Oecologia

, Volume 180, Issue 3, pp 797–807

Intraspecific differences in plant chemotype determine the structure of arthropod food webs

  • János Bálint
  • Sharon E. Zytynska
  • Rozália Veronika Salamon
  • Mohsen Mehrparvar
  • Wolfgang W. Weisser
  • Oswald J. Schmitz
  • Klára Benedek
  • Adalbert Balog
Community ecology - Original research

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-015-3508-y

Cite this article as:
Bálint, J., Zytynska, S.E., Salamon, R.V. et al. Oecologia (2016) 180: 797. doi:10.1007/s00442-015-3508-y

Abstract

It is becoming increasingly appreciated that the structure and functioning of ecological food webs are controlled by the nature and level of plant chemicals. It is hypothesized that intraspecific variation in plant chemical resistance, in which individuals of a host-plant population exhibit genetic differences in their chemical contents (called ‘plant chemotypes’), may be an important determinant of variation in food web structure and functioning. We evaluated this hypothesis using field assessments and plant chemical assays in the tansy plant Tanacetum vulgare L. (Asteraceae). We examined food webs in which chemotypes of tansy plants are the resource for two specialized aphids, their predators and mutualistic ants. The density of the ant-tended aphid Metopeurum fuscoviride was significantly higher on particular chemotypes (borneol) than others. Clear chemotype preferences between predators were also detected. Aphid specialist seven-spotted ladybird beetles (Coccinella septempunctata) were more often found on camphor plants, while significantly higher numbers of the polyphagous nursery web spider (Pisaura mirabilis) were observed on borneol plants. The analysis of plant chemotype effects on the arthropod community clearly demonstrates a range of possible outcomes between plant-aphid-predator networks. The findings help to offer a deeper insight into how one important factor—plant chemical content—influences which species coexist within a food web on a particular host plant and the nature of their trophic linkages.

Keywords

Aphids Ants Bottom-up effects Interactions Predation Top-down effects 

Supplementary material

442_2015_3508_MOESM1_ESM.jpg (168 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (JPEG 168 kb)
442_2015_3508_MOESM2_ESM.docx (180 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 180 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • János Bálint
    • 1
  • Sharon E. Zytynska
    • 2
  • Rozália Veronika Salamon
    • 3
  • Mohsen Mehrparvar
    • 4
  • Wolfgang W. Weisser
    • 2
  • Oswald J. Schmitz
    • 5
  • Klára Benedek
    • 1
  • Adalbert Balog
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Technical and Human ScienceSapientia UniversityTirgu-MuresRomania
  2. 2.Terrestrial Ecology Research Group, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Centre for Food and Life Sciences WeihenstephanTechnische Universität MünchenFreising-WeihenstephanGermany
  3. 3.Department of Food Science, Faculty of Technical ScienceSapientia UniversityMiercurea CiucRomania
  4. 4.Department of Biodiversity, Institute of Science and High Technology and Environmental SciencesGraduate University of Advanced TechnologyKermanIran
  5. 5.School of Forestry and Environmental StudiesYale University New HavenUSA

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