Oecologia

, Volume 168, Issue 2, pp 425–437

Influence of habitat complexity and landscape configuration on pollination and seed-dispersal interactions of wild cherry trees

  • Nils Breitbach
  • Svenja Tillmann
  • Matthias Schleuning
  • Claudia Grünewald
  • Irina Laube
  • Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
  • Katrin Böhning-Gaese
Plant-Animal interactions - Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00442-011-2090-1

Cite this article as:
Breitbach, N., Tillmann, S., Schleuning, M. et al. Oecologia (2012) 168: 425. doi:10.1007/s00442-011-2090-1

Abstract

Land-use intensification is a major cause for the decline in species diversity in human-modified landscapes. The loss of functionally important species can reduce a variety of ecosystem functions, such as pollination and seed dispersal, but the intricate relationships between land-use intensity, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are still contentious. Along a gradient from forest to intensively used farmland, we quantified bee species richness, visitation rates of bees and pollination success of wild cherry trees (Prunus avium). We analysed the effects of structural habitat diversity at a local scale and of the proportion of suitable habitat around each tree at a landscape scale. We compared these findings with those from previous studies of seed-dispersing birds and mammals in the same model system and along the same land-use gradient. Bee species richness and visitation rates were found to be highest in structurally simple habitats, whereas bird species richness—but not their visitation rates—were highest in structurally complex habitats. Mammal visitation rates were only influenced at the landscape scale. These results show that different functional groups of animals respond idiosyncratically to gradients in habitat and landscape structure. Despite strong effects on bees and birds, pollination success and bird seed removal did not differ along the land-use gradient at both spatial scales. These results suggest that mobile organisms, such as bees and birds, move over long distances in intensively used landscapes and thereby buffer pollination and seed-dispersal interactions. We conclude that measures of species richness and interaction frequencies are not sufficient on their own to understand the ultimate consequences of land-use intensification on ecosystem functioning.

Keywords

Biodiversity Mutualism Ecosystem function Land-use change Plant–animal interactions 

Supplementary material

442_2011_2090_MOESM1_ESM.doc (82 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 82 kb)
442_2011_2090_MOESM2_ESM.doc (104 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 105 kb)
442_2011_2090_MOESM3_ESM.doc (134 kb)
Supplementary material 3 (DOC 134 kb)
442_2011_2090_MOESM4_ESM.doc (80 kb)
Supplementary material 4 (DOC 79 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nils Breitbach
    • 1
    • 2
  • Svenja Tillmann
    • 1
    • 3
  • Matthias Schleuning
    • 2
  • Claudia Grünewald
    • 1
    • 2
  • Irina Laube
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
    • 4
  • Katrin Böhning-Gaese
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Community and Macroecology Group, Abteilung Ökologie, Institut für ZoologieJohannes Gutenberg-UniversitätMainzGermany
  2. 2.Biodiversität und Klima Forschungszentrum (BiK-F)Frankfurt a. MGermany
  3. 3.Institut für BiologiedidaktikJustus-Liebig-Universität GießenGießenGermany
  4. 4.Lehrstuhl für Tierökologie und Tropenbiologie (Zoologie III)Julius-Maximilians-UniversitätWürzburgGermany
  5. 5.Institut für Ökologie, Evolution und DiversitätJohann Wolfgang Goethe-UniversitätFrankfurt a. MGermany