Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 343, Issue 2, pp 343–355

Revisiting the anatomy of the central nervous system of a hemimetabolous model insect species: the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

  • Martin Kollmann
  • Sebastian Minoli
  • Joël Bonhomme
  • Uwe Homberg
  • Joachim Schachtner
  • Denis Tagu
  • Sylvia Anton
Regular Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00441-010-1099-9

Cite this article as:
Kollmann, M., Minoli, S., Bonhomme, J. et al. Cell Tissue Res (2011) 343: 343. doi:10.1007/s00441-010-1099-9

Abstract

Aphids show a marked phenotypic plasticity, producing asexual or sexual and winged or wingless morphs depending on environmental conditions and season. We describe here the general structure of the brain of various morphs of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This is the first detailed anatomical study of the central nervous system of an aphid by immunocytochemistry (synapsin, serotonin, and several neuropeptides), ethyl-gallate staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and three-dimensional reconstructions. The study has revealed well-developed optic lobes composed of lamina, medulla, and lobula complex. Ocelli are only present in males and winged parthenogenetic females. The central complex is well-defined, with a central body divided into two parts, a protocerebral bridge, and affiliated lateral accessory lobes. The mushroom bodies are ill-defined, lacking calyces, and only being visualized by using an antiserum against the neuropeptide orcokinin. The antennal lobes contain poorly delineated glomeruli but can be clearly visualized by performing antennal backfills. On the basis of our detailed description of the brain of winged and wingless parthenogenetic A. pisum females, an anatomical map is now available that should improve our knowledge of the way that these structures are involved in the regulation of phenotypic plasticity.

Keywords

Insect nervous system Brain Neuropil Phenotypic plasticity Aphids Acyrtophison pisum (Insecta) 

Abbreviations

5HT

Serotonin

a

Anterior

AL

Antennal lobe

AN

Antennal nerve

Asn13-OK

Asn13-orcokinin

CB

Central body

CBL

Lower division of the central body

CBU

Upper division of the central body

CNS

Central nervous system

d

Dorsal

DL

Dorsal lobe

G

Glomerulus

GA

Glutaraldehyde

l

Lateral

La

Lamina

LAL

Lateral accessory lobe

LALcom

Lateral accessory lobe commissure

Lodm

Lobula dorso-median lobe

Loi

Lobula inner lobe

Loo

Lobula outer lobe

LoX

Lobula complex

Mas-AT

Manduca sexta allatotropin

MB

Mushroom body

Me

Medulla

MeD1 D2

Medulla divisions

mL

Mushroom body median lobe

NGS

Normal goat serum

OL

Optic lobe

PB

Protocerebral bridge

PBS

Phosphate-buffered saline

PFA

Paraformaldehyde

Pea-PVK-II

Periplaneta americana periviscerokinin II

RT

Room temperature

SEG

Subesophageal ganglion

TGM

Thoracic ganglionic mass

TrX

Triton X

v

Ventral

vL

Mushroom body ventral lobe

Supplementary material

441_2010_1099_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (880 kb)
Fig. S1Brain of the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (orientation bar: d dorsal, l lateral, p posterior). Insets top right Position of the depicted brain area. a Single optical section showing synapsin immunostaining of a winged parthenogenetic female. An inner (Loi), outer (Loo), and dorso-median (Lodm) lobe can be distinguished within the lobula complex. b Optical section of a synapsin-immunostained brain of a winged parthenogenetic animal showing the most anterior part of the protocerebral bridge (PB). The two arms of the PB touch each other at the midline of the brain. c Synapsin immunostaining of a wingless parthenogenetic animal showing the upper (CBU) and lower (CBL) divisions of the central body. The border between the two divisions is marked by a layer of highly synapsin-immunoreactive fibers (arrowheads). d Differences in serotonin-immunoreactive profiles between the CBU and CBL of a winged parthenogenetic animal. Whereas the CBU shows strong serotonin immunostaining, the CBL is almost devoid of immunoreactive fibers. e The DC 0 antibody labeled up to four large cell bodies at the dorsal border of the brain in each hemisphere (arrows). Only two cell bodies are visible in this stack of optical sections (maximum intensity projection); they send neurites into the protocerebrum (arrowheads) in a wingless parthenogenetic female. Note that the fibers project into an area dorsal to the CB (stars). Bar 20 μm (PDF 879 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Kollmann
    • 1
  • Sebastian Minoli
    • 2
    • 4
  • Joël Bonhomme
    • 3
  • Uwe Homberg
    • 1
  • Joachim Schachtner
    • 1
  • Denis Tagu
    • 3
  • Sylvia Anton
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biology - Animal PhysiologyPhilipps University MarburgMarburgGermany
  2. 2.Centre de Recherches de VersaillesINRA, UMR 1272 PISCVersaillesFrance
  3. 3.Domaine de la MotteINRA Rennes, UMR1099 BiO3PLe RheuFrance
  4. 4.Laboratory of Insect Physiology (74b), DBBE, C1428EHAUniversity of Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina

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