Regular Article

Cell and Tissue Research

, Volume 319, Issue 3, pp 429-438

First online:

In vivo chondrogenesis of adult bone-marrow-derived autologous mesenchymal stem cells

  • Jinwu ChenAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical SciencesThe Stomatological School, The Fourth Military Medical University
  • , Changyong WangAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences Email author 
  • , Shuanghong LüAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences
  • , Junzheng WuAffiliated withThe Stomatological School, The Fourth Military Medical University
  • , Ximin GuoAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences
  • , Cuimi DuanAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences
  • , Lingzhi DongAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences
  • , Ying SongAffiliated withOrgan Recovery Systems, Port City Center
  • , Junchuan ZhangAffiliated withDepartment of Macromolecular Science, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of Ministry of Education, Fudan University
    • , Dianying JingAffiliated withDepartment of Macromolecular Science, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of Ministry of Education, Fudan University
    • , Linbo WuAffiliated withDepartment of Macromolecular Science, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of Ministry of Education, Fudan University
    • , Jiandong DingAffiliated withDepartment of Macromolecular Science, Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers of Ministry of Education, Fudan University
    • , Dexue LiAffiliated withBeijing Institute of Basic Medical Sciences

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Abstract

The purpose of this study has been to investigate the possible effects of the normal joint cavity environment on chondrocytic differentiation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Autologous bone marrow was aspirated from the iliac crest of male sheep. MSCs were purified, expanded, and labeled with the fluorescent dye PKH26. Labeled MSCs were then grown on a three-dimensional porous scaffold of poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) in vitro and implanted into the joint cavity by a surgical procedure. At 4 or 8 weeks after implantation, the implants were removed for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis. The cells labeled with red fluorescent PKH26 in the implants expressed type II collagen and synthesized sulfated proteoglycans. However, the osteoblast-specific marker, osteocalcin, was not detected by immunohistochemistry indicating that the implanted MSCs had not differentiated into osteoblasts by being directly exposed to the normal joint cavity. To investigate the possible factors involved in chondrocytic differentiation of MSCs further, we co-cultured sheep MSCs with the main components of the normal joint cavity, viz., synovial fluid or synovial cells, in vitro. After 1 or 2 weeks of co-culture, the MSCs in both co-culture systems expressed markers of chondrogenesis. These results suggest that synovial fluid and synovium from normal joint cavity are important for the chondrocytic differentiation of adult bone-marrow-derived MSCs.

Keywords

Mesenchymal stem cell Chondrogenesis Microenvironment Tissue engineering In vivo differentiation Sheep