Human Genetics

, Volume 98, Issue 2, pp 162–166

Fetal cells in maternal blood: recovery by charge flow separation

Authors

  • S. S. Wachtel
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, Memphis TN 38103, USA
  • David Sammons
    • BioSeparations Inc., Tucson AZ 85719, USA
  • Michael Manley
    • BioSeparations Inc., Tucson AZ 85719, USA
  • Gwendolyn Wachtel
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, Memphis TN 38103, USA
  • Garland Twitty
    • BioSeparations Inc., Tucson AZ 85719, USA
  • Joseph Utermohlen
    • BioSeparations Inc., Tucson AZ 85719, USA
  • Owen P. Phillips
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, Memphis TN 38103, USA
  • Lee P. Shulman
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, Memphis TN 38103, USA
  • Douglas J. Taron
    • Vysis Inc., Downers Grove IL 60515, USA
  • U. R. Müller
    • Vysis Inc., Downers Grove IL 60515, USA
  • Peter Koeppen
    • Vysis Inc., Downers Grove IL 60515, USA
  • Teresa M. Ruffalo
    • Vysis Inc., Downers Grove IL 60515, USA
  • Karen Addis
    • Copperstate Ob-Gyn, Tucson AZ 85712, USA
  • Richard Porreco
    • Rocky Mountain Perinatal Associates, Denver CO 80218, USA
  • Joyce Murata-Collins
    • The Children’s Hospital and The University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver CO 80218, USA
  • Natalie B. Parker
    • The Children’s Hospital and The University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver CO 80218, USA
  • Loris McGavran
    • The Children’s Hospital and The University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver CO 80218, USA
Original investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s004390050181

Cite this article as:
Wachtel, S., Sammons, D., Manley, M. et al. Hum Genet (1996) 98: 162. doi:10.1007/s004390050181

Abstract

Fetal blood cells can be recovered from the maternal circulation by charge flow separation (CFS), a method that obviates the risks associated with amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling. By CFS, we processed blood samples from 13 women carrying male fetuses, 2 carrying fetuses with trisomy 21, and 1 who had delivered a stillborn infant with trisomy 18. On average more than 2000 fetal nucleated red blood cells were recovered per 20-ml sample of maternal blood. Recovery of fetal cells was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for chromosomes Y, 18 and 21. After culturing of CFS-processed cells, amplification by the polymerase chain reaction revealed Y-chromosomal DNA in clones from four of six women bearing male fetuses, but not in clones from three women bearing female fetuses.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996