Human Genetics

, Volume 107, Issue 1, pp 1–6

Transcription factor hierarchy in Waardenburg syndrome: regulation of MITF expression by SOX10 and PAX3

Authors

  • S. Brian Potterf
    • Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 49 Convent Drive MSC4472, Bethesda, MD 20892-4472, USA
  • Minao Furumura
    • Laboratory of Cell Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA
  • Karen J. Dunn
    • Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 49 Convent Drive MSC4472, Bethesda, MD 20892-4472, USA
  • Heinz Arnheiter
    • Laboratory of Developmental Neurogenetics, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA
  • William J. Pavan
    • Genetic Disease Research Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 49 Convent Drive MSC4472, Bethesda, MD 20892-4472, USA
Rapid Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s004390000328

Cite this article as:
Potterf, S., Furumura, M., Dunn, K. et al. Hum Genet (2000) 107: 1. doi:10.1007/s004390000328

Abstract.

Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is associated with neural crest-derived melanocyte deficiency caused by mutations in either one of three transcription factors: MITF, PAX3, and SOX10. However, the hierarchical relationship of these transcription factors is largely unknown. We show that SOX10 is capable of transactivating the MITF promoter 100-fold, and that this transactivation is further stimulated by PAX3. Promoter deletion and mutational analyses indicate that SOX10 can activate MITF expression through binding to a region that is evolutionarily conserved between the mouse and human MITF promoters. A SOX10 mutant that models C-terminal truncations in WS can reduce wild-type SOX10 induction of MITF, suggesting these mutations may act in a dominant-negative fashion. Our data support a model in which the hypopigmentation in WS, of which these factors have been implicated, results from a disruption in function of the central melanocyte transcription factor MITF.

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© Springer-Verlag 2000