Short Report

Human Genetics

, Volume 106, Issue 4, pp 453-454

First online:

Multiple origins of Tibetan Y chromosomes

  • Yaping QianAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
  • , Binzhi QianAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
  • , Bing SuAffiliated withHuman Genetics Center, University of Texas Houston, 6901 Bertner, Houston, Texas, 77030, U.S.A.
  • , Jiankun YuAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
  • , Yuehai KeAffiliated withHuman Genetics Center, University of Texas Houston, 6901 Bertner, Houston, Texas, 77030, U.S.A.
  • , Zhengtao ChuAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
  • , Lei ShiAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
  • , Daru LuAffiliated withInstitute of Genetics and Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
  • , Jiayou ChuAffiliated withInstitute of Medical Biology, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, China
    • , Li JinAffiliated withInstitute of Genetics and Morgan-Tan International Center for Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China

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Abstract.

The genetic origin of Tibetans was investigated using Y chromosome markers. A total of three populations were studied, two from central Tibet speaking central Tibetan and one from Yunnan speaking Kham. Two dominant paternal lineages (>80%) were identified in all three populations with one possibly from central Asia (YAP+) and the other from east Asia (M122C). We conclude that Tibetan Y chromosomes may have been derived from two different gene pools, given the virtual absence of M122C in central Asia and YAP+ in east Asia, with drift an unlikely mechanism accounting for these observations.