Human Genetics

, Volume 125, Issue 1, pp 81–93

Identification of common genetic variants that account for transcript isoform variation between human populations

  • Wei Zhang
  • Shiwei Duan
  • Wasim K. Bleibel
  • Steven A. Wisel
  • R. Stephanie Huang
  • Xiaolin Wu
  • Lijun He
  • Tyson A. Clark
  • Tina X. Chen
  • Anthony C. Schweitzer
  • John E. Blume
  • M. Eileen Dolan
  • Nancy J. Cox
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00439-008-0601-x

Cite this article as:
Zhang, W., Duan, S., Bleibel, W.K. et al. Hum Genet (2009) 125: 81. doi:10.1007/s00439-008-0601-x

Abstract

In addition to the differences between populations in transcriptional and translational regulation of genes, alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is also likely to play an important role in regulating gene expression and generating variation in mRNA and protein isoforms. Recently, the genetic contribution to transcript isoform variation has been reported in individuals of recent European descent. We report here results of an investigation of the differences in AS patterns between human populations. AS patterns in 176 HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals of European and African ancestry were evaluated using the Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Exon 1.0 ST Array. A variety of biological processes such as response to stimulus and transcription were found to be enriched among the differentially spliced genes. The differentially spliced genes also include some involved in human diseases that have different prevalence or susceptibility between populations. The genetic contribution to the population differences in transcript isoform variation was then evaluated by a genome-wide association using the HapMap genotypic data on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The results suggest that local and distant genetic variants account for a substantial fraction of the observed transcript isoform variation between human populations. Our findings provide new insights into the complexity of the human genome as well as the health disparities between the two populations.

Supplementary material

439_2008_601_MOESM1_ESM.xls (746 kb)
Supplemental Table S1. Differentially spliced probesets between the CEU and YRI samples, Supplemental Table S2. Associated SNP’s with the differentially spliced probesets, Supplemental Table S3. Primers used in the validation of differentially spliced probesets (XLS 746 kb)
439_2008_601_MOESM2_ESM.tif (110 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 1 The workflow chart. Exon-level expression of the CEU and YRI trios was measured using theAffymetrix Human Exon 1.0ST array. Splicing index values were compared between the twopopulations to identify differential probesets. Genetic variants associated with the differentialprobesets and enriched pathways and/or Gene Ontology terms were then identified.254x190mm (72 x 72 DPI) (TIFF 110 kb)
439_2008_601_MOESM3_ESM.tif (117 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 2 PS3527423 (PARP2) is differentially spliced among 54 unrelated CEU samples. Blue indicates thepresence of both spliced and unspliced isoforms (300bp and 400bp); Red indicates unsplicedisoforms (400bp); Black indicates spliced isoforms (300bp).254x190mm (72 x 72 DPI) (TIFF 116 kb)
439_2008_601_MOESM4_ESM.tif (65 kb)
Supplemental Fig. 3 Validation of transcript isoform variation between populations using quantitative Real-Time PCR. Therelative expression between the exon of interest (EOI) and the neighboring, housekeeping exon(HKE) was shown. (A) MPRL43 (probeset: 3303658) has a lower ratio (one-tail t test p = 0.02) inCEU, consistent with the trend of SI (CEU SI mean = -0.02; YRI SI mean = 0.06). (B) MTMR4(probeset: 3764493) has a lower ratio (one-tail t test p = 0.05) in CEU consistent with the trend ofSI (CEU SI mean = 0.004; YRI SI mean = 0.024).254x190mm (72 x 72 DPI) (TIFF 64 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei Zhang
    • 1
  • Shiwei Duan
    • 1
  • Wasim K. Bleibel
    • 1
  • Steven A. Wisel
    • 1
  • R. Stephanie Huang
    • 1
  • Xiaolin Wu
    • 1
  • Lijun He
    • 1
  • Tyson A. Clark
    • 2
  • Tina X. Chen
    • 2
  • Anthony C. Schweitzer
    • 2
  • John E. Blume
    • 2
  • M. Eileen Dolan
    • 1
  • Nancy J. Cox
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of MedicineThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Expression Research LaboratoryAffymetrix Inc.Santa ClaraUSA
  3. 3.Department of Human GeneticsThe University of ChicagoChicagoUSA