Human Genetics

, Volume 121, Issue 2, pp 155–160

Resequencing and association analysis of the SP110 gene in adult pulmonary tuberculosis

Authors

  • Jeffrey S. Szeszko
    • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of Cambridge
  • Barry Healy
    • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of Cambridge
  • Helen Stevens
    • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of Cambridge
  • Yanina Balabanova
    • HPA Mycobacterium Reference Unit and Clinical TB and HIV Group, Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute for Cell and Molecular SciencesBarts and the London Medical School
  • Francis Drobniewski
    • HPA Mycobacterium Reference Unit and Clinical TB and HIV Group, Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute for Cell and Molecular SciencesBarts and the London Medical School
  • John A. Todd
    • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of Cambridge
    • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation/Wellcome Trust Diabetes and Inflammation Laboratory, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Department of Medical GeneticsUniversity of Cambridge
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/s00439-006-0293-z

Cite this article as:
Szeszko, J.S., Healy, B., Stevens, H. et al. Hum Genet (2007) 121: 155. doi:10.1007/s00439-006-0293-z

Abstract

Recently, the Intracellular pathogen resistance 1 (Ipr1) gene was shown to control susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice. We examined whether common sequence variants of its human orthologue, the SP110 gene, are associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis in a human population. We resequenced SP110 exons in 96 individuals and identified new polymorphisms. Then, we combined our sequence and HapMap data for 83 distinct polymorphisms and selected tags that capture information for all common variants in the 100 kb region around SP110. We genotyped 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms including seven amino-acid changing variants in 1,912 HIV-negative culture-confirmed adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 2,104 adult healthy controls from Russia and found no evidence of association. Our results indicate that common polymorphisms of the SP110 gene have no major effect on susceptibility to tuberculosis in this population.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006