Molecular and General Genetics MGG

, Volume 264, Issue 1, pp 119–126

Characterization of Ce-atl-1, an ATM-like gene from Caenorhabditis elegans

  • H. Aoki
  • S. Sato
  • T. Takanami
  • T. Ishihara
  • I. Katsura
  • H. Takahashi
  • A. Higashitani
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s004380000291

Cite this article as:
Aoki, H., Sato, S., Takanami, T. et al. Mol Gen Genet (2000) 264: 119. doi:10.1007/s004380000291

Abstract

An ATM-like gene was identified in the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans. The putative product of the gene, termed Ce-atl-1 (C. elegans ATM-like 1) consists of 2514 amino acid residues. The C-terminal sequence, which contains a PI-3 kinase-like domain, showed good homology with the products of the gene MEC1/ESR1 from budding yeast, the rad3+ gene of fission yeast and mammalian ATR (ataxia-telangiectasia and rad3+ related) genes. The results of RNA-mediated interference indicated that the major phenotype associated with repression of Ce-atl-1 was lethality (approximately 50–80%) during early embryogenesis. Among the surviving progeny, males (XO animals) arose at a high frequency (2–30%). In addition, 5% of oocyte chromosomes demonstrated aneuploidy due to a defect in pre-meiotic chromosomal segregation. Gene expression analyses indicated that Ce-atl-1 mRNA was expressed in all larval stages and that its level increased about fivefold in the adult stage. The adult expression level was decreased in the glp-4 mutant, which is defective in germ line proliferation. Ce-atl-1 was strongly expressed in both the mitotic and meiotic cells of adult gonads. In summary, Ce-atl-1 appears to be important for early embryogenesis, and loss of its function results in a defect in chromosome segregation, similar to what has been observed for AT-related proteins.

Phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs) Ataxia telangiectasia Checkpoint control Aneuploidy RNAi

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Aoki
    • 1
  • S. Sato
    • 2
  • T. Takanami
    • 1
  • T. Ishihara
    • 3
  • I. Katsura
    • 3
  • H. Takahashi
    • 1
  • A. Higashitani
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Genetic Ecology, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577Japan
  2. 2.Kazusa DNA Research Institute, 1532-3 Yana, Kisarazu, Chiba 292-0812Japan
  3. 3.National Institute of Genetics, 1,111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540Japan