Parasitology Research

, Volume 116, Issue 4, pp 1247–1256

Preliminary genetic evidence of two different populations of Opisthorchis viverrini in Lao PDR

  • Opal Pitaksakulrat
  • Nadda Kiatsopit
  • Nonglak Laoprom
  • Bonnie L. Webster
  • Joanne P. Webster
  • Poppy H. L. Lamberton
  • Thewarach Laha
  • Ross H. Andrews
  • Trevor N. Petney
  • David Blair
  • Elizabeth J. Carlton
  • Robert C. Spear
  • Paiboon Sithithaworn
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-017-5401-6

Cite this article as:
Pitaksakulrat, O., Kiatsopit, N., Laoprom, N. et al. Parasitol Res (2017) 116: 1247. doi:10.1007/s00436-017-5401-6

Abstract

Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. Various reports have suggested that this parasite may represent a species complex, with genetic structure in the region perhaps being dictated by geographical factors and different species of intermediate hosts. We used four microsatellite loci to analyze O. viverrini adult worms originating from six species of cyprinid fish in Thailand and Lao PDR. Two distinct O. viverrini populations were observed. In Ban Phai, Thailand, only one subgroup occurred, hosted by two different fish species. Both subgroups occurred in fish from That Luang, Lao PDR, but were represented to very different degrees among the fish hosts there. Our data suggest that, although geographical separation is more important than fish host specificity in influencing genetic structure, it is possible that two species of Opisthorchis, with little interbreeding, are present near Vientiane in Lao PDR.

Keywords

Microsatellite DNA Opisthorchis viverrini Population genetics Host factors Cyprinid fish 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Opal Pitaksakulrat
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nadda Kiatsopit
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nonglak Laoprom
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Bonnie L. Webster
    • 5
    • 6
  • Joanne P. Webster
    • 7
    • 8
  • Poppy H. L. Lamberton
    • 9
  • Thewarach Laha
    • 1
  • Ross H. Andrews
    • 1
    • 2
    • 7
    • 10
  • Trevor N. Petney
    • 10
    • 11
  • David Blair
    • 12
  • Elizabeth J. Carlton
    • 13
  • Robert C. Spear
    • 14
  • Paiboon Sithithaworn
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology, Faculty of MedicineKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  2. 2.Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of MedicineKhon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  3. 3.Faculty of Veterinary SciencePrince of Songkla UniversitySongkhlaThailand
  4. 4.Department of General Science, Faculty of Science and EngineeringKasetsart UniversitySakon NakhonThailand
  5. 5.Department of Life Sciences, Parasites and Vectors Division, Natural History MuseumLondonUK
  6. 6.The London Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease Research (LCNTDR)Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine (St Mary’s Campus)LondonUK
  7. 7.Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine (St Mary’s Campus)LondonUK
  8. 8.Department of Pathology and Pathogen Biology, Centre for Emerging, Endemic and Exotic Diseases (CEEED), Royal Veterinary CollegeUniversity of LondonLondonUK
  9. 9.Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, and Wellcome Centre for Molecular ParasitologyGlasgowUK
  10. 10.Cholangiocarcinoma Screening and Care Program(CASCAP) Khon Kaen UniversityKhon KaenThailand
  11. 11.Institute of Zoology 1: Ecology and ParasitologyKarlsruhe Institute of TechnologyKarlsruheGermany
  12. 12.Centre for Tropical Diversity and Climate changeJames Cook UniversityTownsvilleAustralia
  13. 13.Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Colorado School of Public HealthAuroraUSA
  14. 14.Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public HealthUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA