Parasitology Research

, Volume 107, Issue 6, pp 1489–1494

Prevalence and molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pigs in Henan, China

  • Rongjun Wang
  • Shuxing Qiu
  • Fuchun Jian
  • Sumei Zhang
  • Yujuan Shen
  • Longxian Zhang
  • Changshen Ning
  • Jianping Cao
  • Meng Qi
  • Lihua Xiao
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-010-2024-6

Cite this article as:
Wang, R., Qiu, S., Jian, F. et al. Parasitol Res (2010) 107: 1489. doi:10.1007/s00436-010-2024-6

Abstract

The distribution and public health significance of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes in pigs differ among geographic areas and studies. To characterize the prevalence of cryptosporidiosis in pigs in Henan, China, a total of 1,350 fecal samples from 14 farms in ten prefectures in Henan Province were examined. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 8.2% (111/1,350), with the highest infection rate (79/383 or 20.6%) in 1–2-month-old piglets and the lowest infection rates in 3–6-month-old pigs. Cryptosporidium-positive samples from 108 animals were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene, and 35 were further analyzed by DNA sequencing of the PCR products. Two Cryptosporidium species/genotype were identified, including Cryptosporidium suis (94/108) and the Cryptosporidium pig genotype II (14/108). C. suis infection was more common in younger piglets whereas the pig genotype II was relatively common in older pigs. These findings suggest that pigs are not a major source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium in the study area.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rongjun Wang
    • 1
  • Shuxing Qiu
    • 1
  • Fuchun Jian
    • 1
  • Sumei Zhang
    • 1
  • Yujuan Shen
    • 2
  • Longxian Zhang
    • 1
  • Changshen Ning
    • 1
  • Jianping Cao
    • 2
  • Meng Qi
    • 1
  • Lihua Xiao
    • 3
  1. 1.The College of Animal Science and Veterinary MedicineHenan Agricultural UniversityZhengzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.National Institute for Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and PreventionShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental DiseaseNational Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA