Parasitology Research

, 104:1163

Larvicidal potential of medicinal plant extracts against Anopheles subpictus Grassi and Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae)

Authors

  • C. Kamaraj
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
  • A. Bagavan
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
  • A. Abduz Zahir
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
  • G. Elango
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
  • G. Pandiyan
    • Unit of Bioactive Natural Products, P.G. and Research Department of ZoologyC. Abdul Hakeem College
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-008-1306-8

Cite this article as:
Kamaraj, C., Bagavan, A., Rahuman, A.A. et al. Parasitol Res (2009) 104: 1163. doi:10.1007/s00436-008-1306-8

Abstract

Mosquito control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The acetone, chloroform, ethyl acetate, hexane, methanol and petroleum ether extracts of leaf, flower and seed of Cassia auriculata L., Leucas aspera (Willd.), Rhinacanthus nasutus KURZ., Solanum torvum Swartz and Vitex negundo Linn. were tested against fourth instar larvae of malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus Grassi and Japanese encephalitis vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest mortality was found in leaf petroleum ether, flower methanol extracts of C. auriculata, flower methanol extracts of L. aspera and R. nasutus, leaf and seed methanol extracts of S. torvum and leaf hexane extract of V. negundo against the larvae of A. subpictus (LC50 = 44.21, 44.69, 53.16, 41.07, 35.32, 28.90 and 44.40 ppm; LC90 = 187.31, 188.29, 233.18, 142.66, 151.60, 121.05 and 192.11 ppm, respectively) and against the larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50 = 69.83, 51.29, 81.24, 71.79, 44.42, 84.47 and 65.35 ppm; LC90 = 335.26, 245.63, 300.45, 361.83, 185.09, 351.41 and 302.42 ppm, respectively). These results suggest that the leaf petroleum ether, flower methanol extracts of C. auriculata, leaf and seed methanol extracts of S. torvum and leaf hexane extract of V. negundo have the potential to be used as an ideal eco-friendly approach for the control of the A. subpictus and C. tritaeniorhynchus. This is the first report on the mosquito larvicidal activity of the medicinal plant extracts.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008