Parasitology Research

, Volume 91, Issue 2, pp 137–143

Study of specific IgG subclass antibodies for diagnosis of Gnathostoma spinigerum

Authors

    • Department of Parasitology, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
    • Chula Medical Research Center, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
  • Vivornpun Sanprasert
    • Medical Microbiology Program, Graduate SchoolChulalongkorn University
  • Montamas Suntravat
    • Medical Microbiology Program, Graduate SchoolChulalongkorn University
  • Kanyarat Kraivichian
    • Department of Parasitology, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
  • Wilai Saksirisampant
    • Department of Parasitology, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
  • Issarang Nuchprayoon
    • Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
    • Chula Medical Research Center, Faculty of MedicineChulalongkorn University
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00436-003-0947-x

Cite this article as:
Nuchprayoon, S., Sanprasert, V., Suntravat, M. et al. Parasitol Res (2003) 91: 137. doi:10.1007/s00436-003-0947-x

Abstract

Gnathostoma spinigerum infection is endemic in Thailand and many Asian countries. Current diagnosis is the skin test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IgG antibody against the G. spinigerum third-stage larvae (L3), but cross-reactivity is common. We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of anti-G. spinigerum L3 IgG subclass antibodies for diagnosis of 43 patients with gnathostomiasis. The majority of patients with gnathostomiasis (91%) had eosinophilia. While the anti-G. spinigerum L3 IgG1 antibody provided the highest sensitivity (98%), the anti-G. spinigerum L3 IgG2 antibody had the highest specificity (88%). The ELISA that detected anti-G. spinigerum L3 IgG1 antibody could be a reliable laboratory screening test, while anti-G. spinigerum L3 IgG2 antibody could be used to confirm the diagnosis.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2003