European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 173, Issue 7, pp 871–878

The burden of pneumococcal meningitis in Austrian children between 2001 and 2008

Authors

  • D. S. Klobassa
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • B. Zoehrer
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • M. Paulke-Korinek
    • Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and ImmunologyMedical University Vienna
  • U. Gruber-Sedlmayr
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • K. Pfurtscheller
    • University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • V. Strenger
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • A. Sonnleitner
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
  • R. Kerbl
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineGeneral Hospital of Leoben
  • B. Ausserer
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineGeneral Hospital of Dornbirn
  • W. Arocker
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineRudolfstiftung Hospital Vienna
  • W. Kaulfersch
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineGeneral Hospital of Klagenfurt
  • B. Hausberger
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineGeneral Hospital of Wiener Neustadt
  • B. Covi
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Innsbruck
  • F. Eitelberger
    • Department of PaediatricsKlinikum Wels Grieskirchen
  • A. Vécsei
    • St. Anna Children’s Hospital, Department of PaediatricsMedical University Vienna
  • B. Simma
    • Department of PaediatricsAcademic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch
  • R. Birnbacher
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineGeneral Hospital of Villach
  • H. Kurz
    • Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineDanube Hospital
  • K. Zwiauer
    • Department of Paediatric and Adolescent MedicineClinicum St. Pölten
  • D. Weghuber
    • Department of Paediatrics, Salzburger LandesklinikenParacelsus Medical University
  • S. Heuberger
    • Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety
  • F. Quehenberger
    • Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and DocumentationMedical University Graz
  • H. Kollaritsch
    • Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and ImmunologyMedical University Vienna
    • Department of General Paediatrics, University Clinic of Paediatrics and Adolescent MedicineMedical University Graz
    • Research Unit Infectiology and Vaccinology, Department of General PaediatricsMedical University Graz
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00431-013-2260-8

Cite this article as:
Klobassa, D.S., Zoehrer, B., Paulke-Korinek, M. et al. Eur J Pediatr (2014) 173: 871. doi:10.1007/s00431-013-2260-8

Abstract

The present study was conducted to evaluate the burden of pneumococcal meningitis in Austrian children between 2001 and 2008. Clinical outcome was retrospectively analyzed both on discharge and on follow-up investigations. This study was based on a prospective multicentre surveillance study on hospitalized invasive pneumococcal infections in Austrian children with a total annual “study population” of about 399,000 children aged below 5 years per year. Between 2001 and 2008, 74 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were identified in children aged below 5 years. The mean annual incidence rate for pneumococcal meningitis was 2.3 per 100,000 children in this age group. In 57/74 children (mean age on admission 14.5 ± 13.3 months), outcome data on hospital discharge were available: 5 deaths (8.8 %), 20 children (35.1 %) with sequelae and 32 children (56.1 %) without sequelae were observed. Sequelae on discharge included motor impairment in 8 children (14.0 %), hearing impairment in 9 children (15.8 %) and/or other complications in 14 children (24.6 %). In 7/8 children with motor deficits, matching cerebral lesions were identified by neuroimaging: cerebral infarction in five children, cerebral vasculitis and cerebral abscess in one child each. In 40/57 children, long-term outcome (18.9 ± 20.2 months after discharge) could be assessed: 1 child (2.5 %) died 9 months after hospital discharge, 11 children (27.5 %) had one or two long-term sequelae and 28 children (70.0 %) had no sequelae. Long-term sequelae included motor impairment in three children (7.5 %), hearing impairment in nine children (22.5 %) and other deficits in two children (5.0 %). Conclusion: Our study confirms that pneumococcal meningitis causes high mortality and severe long-term sequelae. On long-term follow-up, we observed improvements of motor impairment, but not of hearing impairment.

Keywords

Bacterial meningitisStreptococcus pneumoniaePneumococcal diseaseChildrenLong-term outcomeLong-term sequelae

Supplementary material

431_2013_2260_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (15 kb)
Table 2Cerebral lesions with focal neurological deficits as complication of pneumococcal meningitis (PDF 14 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014