European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 167, Issue 2, pp 225–229

Hypothesis: Possible role of retinoic acid therapy in patients with biallelic mismatch repair gene defects

  • Sven Gottschling
  • Harald Reinhard
  • Constanze Pagenstecher
  • Stefan Krüger
  • Jochen Raedle
  • Guido Plotz
  • Wolfram Henn
  • Reinhard Buettner
  • Sascha Meyer
  • Norbert Graf
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00431-007-0474-3

Cite this article as:
Gottschling, S., Reinhard, H., Pagenstecher, C. et al. Eur J Pediatr (2008) 167: 225. doi:10.1007/s00431-007-0474-3

Abstract

A boy showing symptoms of a Turcot-like childhood cancer syndrome together with stigmata of neurofibromatosis type I is reported. His brother suffers from an infantile myofibromatosis, and a sister died of glioblastoma at age 7. Another 7-year-old brother is so far clinically unaffected. The parents are consanguineous. Molecular diagnosis in the index patient revealed a constitutional homozygous mutation of the mismatch repair gene PMS2. The patient was in remission of his glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) after multimodal treatment followed by retinoic acid chemoprevention for 7 years. After discontinuation of retinoic acid medication, he developed a relapse of his brain tumour together with the simultaneous occurrence of three other different HNPCC-related carcinomas. We think that retinoic acid might have provided an effective chemoprevention in this patient with homozygous mismatch repair gene defect. We propose to take a retinoic acid chemoprevention into account in children with proven biallelic PMS2 mismatch repair mutations being at highest risk concerning the development of a malignancy.

Keywords

TurcotRetinoic acidLynchChildhood cancer syndromePMS2

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sven Gottschling
    • 1
  • Harald Reinhard
    • 1
  • Constanze Pagenstecher
    • 2
  • Stefan Krüger
    • 3
  • Jochen Raedle
    • 4
  • Guido Plotz
    • 4
  • Wolfram Henn
    • 5
  • Reinhard Buettner
    • 6
  • Sascha Meyer
    • 1
  • Norbert Graf
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Saarland UniversityUniversity Children’s HospitalHomburgGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Human GeneticsUniversity Hospital BonnBonnGermany
  3. 3.Department of Surgical Research and Institute of Clinical GeneticsDresden University of TechnologyDresdenGermany
  4. 4.Department of Internal Medicine II, Division of GastroenterologySaarland UniversityHomburgGermany
  5. 5.Institute of Human GeneticsSaarland UniversityHomburgGermany
  6. 6.Institute of PathologyUniversity Hospital BonnBonnGermany