Virchows Archiv

, Volume 437, Issue 6, pp 648–655

Proliferation and number of Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10)-reactive epithelial cells and basal cells in normal, hyperplastic and metaplastic bronchial mucosa

  • Peter J. Barth
  • Sabine Koch
  • Bernd Müller
  • Frank Unterstab
  • Peter von Wichert
  • Roland Moll
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s004280000316

Cite this article as:
Barth, P., Koch, S., Müller, B. et al. Virchows Arch (2000) 437: 648. doi:10.1007/s004280000316

Abstract.

Clara cell 10-kDa protein (CC10) is an inhibitor of phospholipase A2 and binds to phosphatidylinositol. It may therefore interfere with intracellular signal transduction. Bronchial CC10-reactive cells have been described by several authors. In contrast to the bronchiolar CC10-containing Clara cell, which is a progenitor cell of terminally differentiated airway epithelium, the role of bronchial CC10-reactive cells remains to be elucidated. We assessed the number of bronchial CC10-reactive cells in relation to cytokeratin (CK) expression and proliferative activity in normal, hyperplastic and squamous metaplastic epithelium. Sixty-five human bronchial mucosal specimens were investigated immunohistochemically for CK expression (CK7, CK13 and CK5/6), proliferative activity (MIB-1) and number of CC10-reactive epithelia. The proliferation fraction of CC10-reactive cells was assessed with double staining for MIB-1 and CC10. The proliferation index of the epithelium differed significantly between normal, hyperplastic and metaplastic epithelium. The number of CC10-reactive cells was inversely related to the epithelial proliferation. Bronchial CC10-reactive cells showed no proliferative activity as assessed using immunohistochemical double staining for CC10 and MIB-1. In contrast to normal and hyperplastic epithelium, squamous metaplasia disclosed CK5/6 in all epithelial layers, a loss of CK7 and a gain of CK13. We conclude that CC10-reactive cells have no progenitor role in the bronchial mucosa. However, because the proliferative activity is inversely related to the number of CC10-reactive cells, the CC10 protein may play a role in the regulation of epithelial repair. Squamous metaplasia most likely originates from basal cells.

CC10-Protein Squamous metaplasia Basal cell hyperplasia Bronchial mucosa

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Barth
    • 1
  • Sabine Koch
    • 1
  • Bernd Müller
    • 2
  • Frank Unterstab
    • 1
  • Peter von Wichert
    • 2
  • Roland Moll
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Philipps University, Baldingerstraße, D-35033 Marburg, Germany
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany