Virchows Archiv

, Volume 446, Issue 4, pp 438–441

Evidence of a polyclonal nature of myositis ossificans

  • Andreas Leithner
  • Andreas Weinhaeusel
  • Petra Zeitlhofer
  • Horst Koch
  • Roman Radl
  • Reinhard Windhager
  • Alfred Beham
  • Oskar A. Haas
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00428-004-1169-z

Cite this article as:
Leithner, A., Weinhaeusel, A., Zeitlhofer, P. et al. Virchows Arch (2005) 446: 438. doi:10.1007/s00428-004-1169-z

Abstract

Myositis ossificans is a localized, self-limiting, reparative lesion that is composed of reactive hypercellular fibrous tissue and bone. Although it is clearly a benign lesion, its clinical, radiological, and histological appearance may sometimes mimic a malignant tumor. Whether myositis ossificans represents a monoconal or polyclonal hyperplastic proliferation is not yet known. To address this question, we therefore extracted DNA from the respective paraffin-embedded tumor tissues of nine women with a median age of 50 years at diagnosis (range: 20–84 years) and studied the X inactivation pattern by means of methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction and primers that target the polymorphic CGG trinucleotide repeat of the FMR1 gene. The fact that we did not detect any skewing of the X inactivation pattern in the five successfully analyzed cases corroborates the notion that myositis ossificans results from a polyclonal proliferation and confirms that it is a reactive, reparative process. Analysis of the X inactivation pattern may, thus, supplement the differential diagnostic work-up of cases with an uncertain histology, at least in the informative proportion of female patients.

Keywords

Myositis ossificans DNA methylation X inactivation Polymerase chain reaction FMR1 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas Leithner
    • 1
  • Andreas Weinhaeusel
    • 2
  • Petra Zeitlhofer
    • 2
  • Horst Koch
    • 3
  • Roman Radl
    • 1
  • Reinhard Windhager
    • 1
  • Alfred Beham
    • 4
  • Oskar A. Haas
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryMedical University GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Children’s Cancer Research Institute (CCRI)St. Anna Children’s HospitalViennaAustria
  3. 3.Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic SurgeryMedical University GrazGrazAustria
  4. 4.Institute of PathologyMedical University GrazGrazAustria

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