Planta

, Volume 207, Issue 3, pp 426–435

Salt stress in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. cell suspensions activates adaptive mechanisms similar to those observed in the whole plant

  • Rosario Vera-Estrella
  • Bronwyn J. Barkla
  • Hans J. Bohnert
  • Omar Pantoja
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s004250050501

Cite this article as:
Vera-Estrella, R., Barkla, B., Bohnert, H. et al. Planta (1999) 207: 426. doi:10.1007/s004250050501

Abstract.

A salt-tolerant stable cell-suspension culture from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. has been established from calli generated from leaves of 6-week-old well-watered plants. Optimal cell growth was observed in the presence of 200 mM NaCl, and within 7 d cells were able to concentrate Na+ to levels exceeding those in the growth medium. Accumulation of Na+ was paralled by increases in the compatible solute pinitol and myo-inositol methyl transferase (IMT), a key enzyme in pinitol biosynthesis. Increasing concentrations of NaCl stimulated the activities of tonoplast and plasma-membrane H+-ATPases. Immunodetection of the ATPases showed that the increased activity was not due to changes in protein amount that could be attributed to treatment conditions. A specific role for these mechanisms in salt-adaptation is supported by the inability of mannitol-induced water stress to elicit the same responses, and the absence of enzyme activity and protein expression associated with Crassulacean acid metabolism in the cells. Results demonstrate that these  M. crystallinum cell suspensions show a halophytic growth response, comparable to that of the whole plant, and thus provide a valuable tool for studying signaling and biochemical pathways involved in salt recognition and response.

Key words:Myo-Inositol methyl transferase Mesem-bryanthemum (salt stress) Plasma-membrane H+-ATPase Pinitol Salt tolerance Vacuolar H+-ATPase 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rosario Vera-Estrella
    • 1
  • Bronwyn J. Barkla
    • 1
  • Hans J. Bohnert
    • 2
  • Omar Pantoja
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Biología Molecular de Plantas, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 510-3, Colonia Miraval, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62250, México
  2. 2.Departments of Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology and of Plant Sciences, The University of Arizona, 1041E Lowell Street, Tucson, Arizona, AZ 85721-0088, USAUS

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