Planta

, Volume 203, Issue 4, pp 406–412

Tomato prosystemin promoter confers wound-inducible, vascular bundle-specific expression of the β-glucuronidase gene in transgenic tomato plants

  • Tania Jacinto
  • Barry McGurl
  • Vincent Franceschi
  • John Delano-Freier
  • Clarence A. Ryan
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s004250050207

Cite this article as:
Jacinto, T., McGurl, B., Franceschi, V. et al. Planta (1997) 203: 406. doi:10.1007/s004250050207

Abstract.

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Better Boy) plants were transformed with a fused gene containing a 2.2-kb promoter fragment of the tomato prosystemin gene and the coding region of the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The transgenic plants exhibited a low constitutive level of prosystemin-β-glucuronidase gene expression, assayed by histochemical staining and GUS enzyme activity, that was associated in the vascular bundles of leaf main veins, petiolules, petioles and stems. The GUS activity in the vascular bundles in each tissue was increased by wounding and by treatment of the plants with methyl jasmonate, similar to the induction of prosystemin in wild-type plants. The increase in GUS activity in the vascular bundles of leaves in response to wounding correlated with the wound-inducible increase in prosystemin mRNA. Tissue printing, using rabbit anti-serum prepared against prosystemin, confirmed that inducible prosystemin protein was localized in vascular bundles of petiolules, petioles and stems of wild-type tomato plants. The evidence indicates that the 2.2-kb promoter region of the tomato prosystemin gene contains elements conferring its correct temporal and spatial expression in the vascular bundles of transgenic tomato plants.

Key words:β-Glucuronidase Lycopersicon (wound re sponse) Methyl jasmonate Prosystemin Wounding Vascular bundle 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tania Jacinto
    • 1
  • Barry McGurl
    • 1
  • Vincent Franceschi
    • 2
  • John Delano-Freier
    • 1
  • Clarence A. Ryan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-6340, USAUS
  2. 2.Department of Botany, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-4238, USAUS