Planta

, Volume 234, Issue 1, pp 207–215

Oviposition by a moth suppresses constitutive and herbivore-induced plant volatiles in maize

  • M. Fernanda Gomes Villalba Peñaflor
  • Matthias Erb
  • Christelle Aurélie Maud Robert
  • Livia Atauri Miranda
  • Andrea Graf Werneburg
  • Fábio Cleisto Alda Dossi
  • Ted C. J. Turlings
  • J. Maurício Simões Bento
Rapid Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s00425-011-1409-9

Cite this article as:
Peñaflor, M.F.G.V., Erb, M., Robert, C.A.M. et al. Planta (2011) 234: 207. doi:10.1007/s00425-011-1409-9

Abstract

Plant volatiles function as important signals for herbivores, parasitoids, predators, and neighboring plants. Herbivore attack can dramatically increase plant volatile emissions in many species. However, plants do not only react to herbivore-inflicted damage, but also already start adjusting their metabolism upon egg deposition by insects. Several studies have found evidence that egg deposition itself can induce the release of volatiles, but little is known about the effects of oviposition on the volatiles released in response to subsequent herbivory. To study this we measured the effect of oviposition by Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) moths on constitutive and herbivore-induced volatiles in maize (Zea mays L.). Results demonstrate that egg deposition reduces the constitutive emission of volatiles and suppresses the typical burst of inducible volatiles following mechanical damage and application of caterpillar regurgitant, a treatment that mimics herbivory. We discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for reducing the plant’s signaling capacity triggered by S. frugiperda oviposition and how suppression of volatile organic compounds can influence the interaction between the plant, the herbivore, and other organisms in its environment. Future studies should consider oviposition as a potential modulator of plant responses to insect herbivores.

Keywords

Fall armyworm Herbivory Manipulation strategy Plant defenses 

Abbreviations

VOCs

Volatile organic compounds

HIPVs

Herbivore-induced plant volatiles

GLVs

Green leaf volatiles

DMNT

(3E)-4,8-Dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene

SA

Salicylic acid

JA

Jasmonic acid

SEM

Scanning electron microscopy

Supplementary material

425_2011_1409_MOESM1_ESM.doc (55 kb)
Supplementary material (DOC 55 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Fernanda Gomes Villalba Peñaflor
    • 1
  • Matthias Erb
    • 2
  • Christelle Aurélie Maud Robert
    • 2
  • Livia Atauri Miranda
    • 2
  • Andrea Graf Werneburg
    • 1
  • Fábio Cleisto Alda Dossi
    • 1
  • Ted C. J. Turlings
    • 2
  • J. Maurício Simões Bento
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Chemical Ecology and Insect Behavior, Department of Entomology and Acarology, Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”University of São PauloPiracicabaBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratory of Fundamental and Applied Research in Chemical Ecology (FARCE), Institute of BiologyUniversity of NeuchâtelNeuchâtelSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations