Planta

, Volume 232, Issue 6, pp 1355–1370

Proteome analysis of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to bacterial volatiles

  • Young Sang Kwon
  • Choong-Min Ryu
  • Soohyun Lee
  • Hyo Bee Park
  • Ki Soo Han
  • Jung Han Lee
  • Kyunghee Lee
  • Woo Sik Chung
  • Mi-Jeong Jeong
  • Hee Kyu Kim
  • Dong-Won Bae
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00425-010-1259-x

Cite this article as:
Kwon, Y.S., Ryu, C., Lee, S. et al. Planta (2010) 232: 1355. doi:10.1007/s00425-010-1259-x

Abstract

Plant root-associated bacteria (rhizobacteria) elicit plant basal immunity referred to as induced systemic resistance (ISR) against multiple pathogens. Among multi-bacterial determinants involving such ISR, the induction of ISR and promotion of growth by bacterial volatile compounds was previously reported. To exploit global de novo expression of plant proteins by bacterial volatiles, proteomic analysis was performed after exposure of Arabidopsis plants to the rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis GB03. Ethylene biosynthesis enzymes were significantly up-regulated. Analysis by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction confirmed that ethylene biosynthesis-related genes SAM-2, ACS4, ACS12, and ACO2 as well as ethylene response genes, ERF1, GST2, and CHIB were up-regulated by the exposure to bacterial volatiles. More interestingly, the emission of bacterial volatiles significantly up-regulated both key defense mechanisms mediated by jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling pathways. In addition, high accumulation of antioxidant proteins also provided evidence of decreased sensitivity to reactive oxygen species during the elicitation of ISR by bacterial volatiles. The present results suggest that the proteomic analysis of plant defense responses in bacterial volatile-mediated ISR can reveal the mechanisms of plant basal defenses orchestrated by endogenous ethylene production pathways and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

Keywords

Bacterial volatilesEthyleneInduced systemic resistancePlant growth-promoting rhizobacteriaProteomics

Abbreviations

ET

Ethylene

ISR

Induced systemic resistance

JA

Jasmonic acid

MS

Murashige and Skoog

PGPR

Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

qRT-PCR

Quantitative RT-PCR

VOC

Volatile organic compound

SA

Salicylic acid

Supplementary material

425_2010_1259_MOESM1_ESM.doc (194 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 194 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Young Sang Kwon
    • 1
    • 4
  • Choong-Min Ryu
    • 2
    • 6
  • Soohyun Lee
    • 2
  • Hyo Bee Park
    • 2
  • Ki Soo Han
    • 1
  • Jung Han Lee
    • 1
  • Kyunghee Lee
    • 3
  • Woo Sik Chung
    • 4
  • Mi-Jeong Jeong
    • 5
  • Hee Kyu Kim
    • 1
  • Dong-Won Bae
    • 1
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Applied Biology and Research Institute of Life ScienceGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuSouth Korea
  2. 2.Laboratory of Microbial GenomicsIndustrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy Research Center, KRIBBDaejeonSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, The Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research CenterYeungnam UniversityDaeguSouth Korea
  4. 4.Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 program)Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research CenterJinjuSouth Korea
  5. 5.Bio-crop Development Division, National Academy of Agricultural ScienceRural Development AdministrationSuwonSouth Korea
  6. 6.Biosystems and Bioengineering ProgramUniversity of Science and Technology (UST)DaejeonSouth Korea
  7. 7.Central Instrument FacilityGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuSouth Korea