Invited Review

Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology

, Volume 461, Issue 4, pp 401-421

First online:

Ion channels in inflammation

  • Michael EisenhutAffiliated withLuton& Dunstable Hospital NHS Foundation Trust Email author 
  • , Helen WallaceAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Liverpool

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Abstract

Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

Keywords

Ion channels Sodium channel Cytokines Nucleotides Prostaglandin Nitric oxide Histamine