European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 86, Issue 1, pp 79–84

The effects of replacing a portion of endurance training by explosive strength training on performance in trained cyclists

  • J. Bastiaans
  • A. Diemen
  • T. Veneberg
  • A. Jeukendrup
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s004210100507

Cite this article as:
Bastiaans, J., Diemen, A., Veneberg, T. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (2001) 86: 79. doi:10.1007/s004210100507

Abstract.

To investigate the effects of replacing a portion of endurance training by strength training on exercise performance, 14 competitive cyclists were divided into an experimental (E; n=6) and a control (C; n=8) group. Both groups received a training program of 9 weeks. The total training volume for both groups was the same [E: 8.8 (1.1) h/week; C: 8.9 (1.7) h/week], but 37% of training for E consisted of explosive-type strength training, whilst C received endurance training only. Simulated time trial performance (TT), short-term performance (STP), maximal workload (\(\dot W_{{\rm max}} \)) and gross (GE) and delta efficiency (DE) were measured before, after 4 weeks and at the end of the training program (9 weeks). No significant group-by-training effects for the markers of endurance performance (TT and \(\dot W_{{\rm max}} \) ) were found after 9 weeks, although after 4 weeks, these markers had only increased (P<0.05) in E. STP decreased (P<0.05) in C, whereas no changes were observed in E. For DE, a significant group-by-training interaction (P<0.05) was found, and for GE the group-by-training interaction was not significant. It is concluded that replacing a portion of endurance training by explosive strength training prevents a decrease in STP without compromising gains in endurance performance of trained cyclists.

Cycling Resistance training Endurance Time trial 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Bastiaans
    • 1
  • A. Diemen
    • 1
  • T. Veneberg
    • 2
  • A. Jeukendrup
    • 3
  1. 1.ADMOTION, Sweelinckplein 45/46, 2517 GP Den HaagThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Amsterdam University, van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Human Performance Laboratory, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT BirminghamUK