European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology

, Volume 77, Issue 6, pp 498–502

Electron spin resonance spectroscopic detection of oxygen-centred radicals in human serum following exhaustive exercise

Authors

  • Tony Ashton
    • Department of Health and Exercise Science, School of Applied Sciences, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, CF37 1DL, UK
  • Christopher C. Rowlands
    • National EPSRC ENDOR Centre, Department of Chemistry, University of Wales College Cardiff, PO Box 912, Cardiff, Wales, CF1 3TB, UK
  • Eleri Jones
    • University of Wales Institute Cardiff, Colchester Avenue, Cardiff, Wales, CF37XR, UK
  • Ian S. Young
    • Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Science, Queens University, Belfast, BT12 6BJ, UK
  • Simon K. Jackson
    • Department of Medical Microbiology, Section of Immunology, University of Wales College of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, CF4 4XW, UK
  • Bruce Davies
    • Department of Health and Exercise Science, School of Applied Sciences, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales, CF37 1DL, UK
  • John R. Peters
    • Department of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, CF4 4XW, UK
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

DOI: 10.1007/s004210050366

Cite this article as:
Ashton, T., Rowlands, C., Jones, E. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (1998) 77: 498. doi:10.1007/s004210050366

Abstract

Free radicals or oxidants are continuously produced in the body as a consequence of normal energy metabolism. The concentration of free radicals, together with lipid peroxidation, increases in some tissues as a physiological response to exercise – they have also been implicated in a variety of pathologies. The biochemical measurement of free radicals has relied in the main on the indirect assay of oxidative stress by-products. This study presents the first use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to measure directly the production of radical species in the venous blood of healthy human volunteers pre- and post-exhaustive aerobic exercise. Evidence is also presented of increased lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity post-exercise.

Key words Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopyOxidantsLipid peroxidation

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998