European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 112, Issue 1, pp 33–42

The exercise dose affects oxidative stress and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in trained men

  • Blair D. Johnson
  • Jaume Padilla
  • Janet P. Wallace
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-011-1946-8

Cite this article as:
Johnson, B.D., Padilla, J. & Wallace, J.P. Eur J Appl Physiol (2012) 112: 33. doi:10.1007/s00421-011-1946-8
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Abstract

The aim of this investigation was to establish whether changes in oxidative stress and endothelial function following acute aerobic exercise are dose-dependent. Ten healthy trained men completed four exercise sessions: 50% VO2peak for 30 min (moderate intensity moderate duration, MIMD), 50% VO2peak for 60 min (moderate intensity long duration, MILD), 80% VO2peak for 30 min (high intensity moderate duration, HIMD), and 80% VO2peak for the time to reach the caloric equivalent of MIMD (high intensity short duration, HISD). Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured as an index of oxidative stress and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed as an index of endothelial function. Variables were measured at baseline, immediately post-exercise, 1 and 2 h post-exercise. Both HIMD (14.2 ± 2.5 μmol/L) and HISD (14.7 ± 1.9 μmol/L) TBARS differed from MIMD (11.8 ± 1.5 μmol/L) immediately post-exercise. TBARS increased from pre to immediately post-exercise for HIMD (12.6 ± 2.1 vs.14.2 ± 2.5 μmol/L) and HISD (12.3 ± 2.8 vs. 14.7 ± 1.9 μmol/L). Both MIMD (7.2 ± 2.2%) and HISD (7.6 ± 2.7%) FMD immediately post-exercise were greater than HIMD (4.7 ± 2.2%). An increase of FMD from pre to immediately post-exercise was found for MIMD (5.0 ± 2.5 vs. 7.2 ± 2.2%) and HISD (5.9 ± 2.4 vs. 7.6 ± 2.7%). These data suggest that acute exercise-induced TBARS are exercise intensity-dependent whereas FMD appears to improve following energy expenditure equivalent to 30 min 50% VO2peak, regardless of intensity or duration.

Keywords

Endothelial function Caloric expenditure Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances Exercise intensity Exercise duration 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Blair D. Johnson
    • 1
  • Jaume Padilla
    • 2
  • Janet P. Wallace
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of KinesiologyIndiana University (HPER 112)BloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical SciencesUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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