European Journal of Applied Physiology

, Volume 111, Issue 10, pp 2557–2569

Effect of 5-day vitamin E supplementation on muscle injury after downhill running in rats

  • Antonios Kyparos
  • Sofia Sotiriadou
  • Vassilis Mougios
  • Angeliki Cheva
  • Sotiris Barbanis
  • George Karkavelas
  • Georgios Arsos
  • Maria Albani
  • Chrysoula Matziari
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00421-011-1888-1

Cite this article as:
Kyparos, A., Sotiriadou, S., Mougios, V. et al. Eur J Appl Physiol (2011) 111: 2557. doi:10.1007/s00421-011-1888-1

Abstract

Antioxidant supplementation has been suggested to prevent exercise-induced muscle injury, but the findings are inconsistent. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential protective role of vitamin E treatment against eccentric exercise-induced muscle injury by examining morphological and functional alterations in rat soleus muscle after downhill running as well as muscle injury markers in the blood. Sixty adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to vitamin E-treated or placebo-treated groups studied at rest, immediately post-exercise or 48 h post-exercise (n = 10 per group). Vitamin E was administered by daily intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg body mass of dl-α-tocopheryl acetate for five consecutive days prior to exercise, resulting in the doubling of its plasma concentration. Downhill running resulted in significant (P < 0.05) changes in all injury markers for the placebo-treated rats at 0 and 48 h post-exercise. However, significantly smaller soleus muscle single-twitch tension (Pt) and unfused (40 Hz) tetanic force, and greater plasma creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activities compared with the control were found only immediately post-exercise for the vitamin E-treated rats (P < 0.05). Maximal tetanic force (Po) did not decline significantly compared to sedentary controls at neither time points measured. The vitamin E-treated rats had significantly (P < 0.05) higher soleus muscle Pt immediately post-exercise than the placebo-treated rats as well as lower plasma CK and LD activity 48 h post-exercise. However, there was no difference in Po decline between groups at either time points measured. Vitamin E-treated rats had less pronounced morphological alterations in muscle in the immediate and 48-h post-exercise period. In conclusion, the effect of short-term vitamin E supplementation against eccentric exercise-induced muscle injury did not appear to be physiologically significant, because vitamin E failed to prevent the decline in the functional measure of Po compared to the placebo conditions.

Keywords

AntioxidantsEccentric exerciseMuscle damageContractile propertiesHistologyCreatine kinaseLactate dehydrogenase

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonios Kyparos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sofia Sotiriadou
    • 2
  • Vassilis Mougios
    • 3
  • Angeliki Cheva
    • 4
  • Sotiris Barbanis
    • 4
  • George Karkavelas
    • 4
  • Georgios Arsos
    • 5
  • Maria Albani
    • 6
  • Chrysoula Matziari
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Physical Education and Sports Science at SerresAristotle University of ThessalonikiSerresGreece
  2. 2.Laboratory of Physiology, Department of Physical Education and Sports ScienceAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Laboratory of Sport Hygiene and Nutrition, Department of Physical Education and Sports ScienceAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  4. 4.Department of Pathology, Faculty of MedicineAristotle UniversityThessalonikiGreece
  5. 5.Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of MedicineAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  6. 6.Laboratory of Physiology, Faculty of MedicineAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece